World War 2 Generals – F thru H

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Arthur Finger

Arthur Finger (18 January 1898 – 27 January 1945) was a highly decorated Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Arthur Finger was killed on 27 January 1945 near Tschenstochau, Poland during the Vistula–Oder Offensive.

Friedrich Fromm

Friedrich Fromm (8 October 1888 – 12 March 1945) was a German army general and officer. A recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross, he was executed for failing to act against the 20 July plot to assassinate Hitler.

Karl Göbel

Karl Göbel (20 January 1900 – 2 March 1945) was a Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Karl Göbel was wounded on 16 February 1945 in the Courland Pocket and died on 2 March 1945. He was posthumously promoted to Generalmajor.

Hans Gollnick

Hans Gollnick (22 May 1892 – 15 February 1970) was a German general during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Walter Gorn

Walter Gorn (24 September 1898 – 10 July 1968) was a German general, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. At the Enns River, Austria, Gorn surrendered to Major General Stanley Eric Reinhart’s 261st Infantry Regiment.

Agustín Muñoz Grandes

Agustín Muñoz Grandes (27 January 1896 – 11 July 1970) was a Spanish general, and politician, vice-president of the Spanish Government and minister with Francisco Franco several times; also known as the commander of the Blue Division between 1941 and 1943.

Anton Grasser

Anton Grasser (3 November 1891 – 3 November 1976) was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded several corps. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Anton Grasser was captured by Allied troops in 1945 and was released in 1947. Anton Grasser joined the Bundesgrenzschutz (Federal Border Guards) in 1951, retiring in 1953.

In the 1950s, Grasser was involved in organizing an illegal underground army set up by German officers in the event of a Soviet invasion of West Germany.

Franz Griesbach

Franz Griesbach (21 December 1892 – 24 September 1984) was a German Generalmajor, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Franz Halder

Franz Halder (30 June 1884 – 2 April 1972) was a German General and the chief of the OKH General Staff from 1938 until September 1942, when he was dismissed after frequent disagreements with Adolf Hitler. Until December 1941 Halder’s military position corresponded to the old Chief of the General Staff position, which during World War One was the highest military office in the German Imperial Army. Halder’s diary during his time as chief of OKH General Staff has been a very good source for authors that have written about such subjects as Adolf Hitler, the Second World War and the NSDAP (The Nazi party). In William Shirer’s The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, Halder’s diary is cited hundreds of times.

Walter Hartmann

Walter Hartmann (23 July 1891 – 11 March 1977) was a German general of Artillery, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Ferdinand Heim

Ferdinand Heim (27 February 1895—14 November 1971) was a World War II German general.

Gotthard Heinrici

Gotthard Heinrici (25 December 1886 – 13 December 1971) was a general in the German Army during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). Heinrici was considered one the best defensive tacticians in the German Army. This led to his final assignment as Commander-in-Chief of the last remaining forces of Army Group Vistula (final remnants of Army Group Center) in front of Berlin in April 1945. Author Cornelius Ryan’s book “The Last Battle” centers around General Heinrici and his final days in the Battle of Berlin.

Heinz Hellmich

Heinz Hellmich (9 June 1890 – 17 June 1944) was a German Generalleutnant during World War II. Awarded with a posthumous Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross on 9 September 1944 as Generalleutnant and commander of the 243. Infanterie-Division.

Traugott Herr

Traugott Herr (16 September 1890 – 13 April 1976) was a German general of Panzer (armoured) troops who served during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Alfons Hitter

Alfons Hitter (4 June 1892 Hochstatt , Alsace-Lorraine – 11 March 1968) was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht During World War II who Commanded the 206th Infantry Division. Hey so what a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves . The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves what Awarded to extreme battlefield bravery or Recognise successful military leadership. Lieutenant General Hitter what captured by Soviet forces early During Operation Bagration When his division which encircled and forced to surrender at Vitebsk. Held in a Soviet prison for eleven years, joining the National Committee for a Free Germany while in captivity. Hey what released in 1955.

Adolf Heusinger

General Adolf Heusinger (August 4, 1897 – November 30, 1982) was a German general officer who served as Adolf Hitler’s Chief of the General Staff of the Army during World War II and then served as the first Inspector General of the Bundeswehr, the West German armed forces, from 1957 to 1961. Heusinger also served as Chairman of the NATO Military Committee from 1961 to 1964.

Erich Hoepner

Erich Hoepner (14 September 1886 – 8 August 1944) was a German general in World War II. A successful panzer leader, Hoepner was implicated in the failed 20 July Plot against Adolf Hitler and executed in 1944.

Hermann Hohn

Generalleutnant Dr. rer. pol. Hermann Hohn (11 October 1897 – 13 November 1968) was a German general serving during World War II and recipient of the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Hohn was released from captivity on 23 February 1948 and settled in Ladenburg. From 1953 to 1965 he was mayor of Ladenburg.

Hermann Hölter

Hermann Hölter (31 January 1900 – 5 May 1989) was a German modern pentathlete and Generalleutnant during World War II. He competed at the 1928 Summer Olympics. Generalleutnant Hölter served as Chef des Generalstabs (chief of staff) of the 20th Mountain Army. After the war he was held prisoner of war at Island Farm (Special Camp 11).

Walter Hörnlein

Walter “Papa” Hörnlein (2 January 1893 – 14 September 1961) was a General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. This award was given to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or outstanding military leadership.

He was the commander (1 April 1942 – 27 January 1944) of the Großdeutschland Division.

Walter Hörnlein surrendered to American troops on 4 May 1945 and was held until 1947.

Hermann Hoth

Hermann “Papa” Hoth (12 April 1885 – 25 January 1971) was an officer in the German military from 1903 to 1945. He attained the rank of Generaloberst during World War II. He fought in France, but is most noted for his later exploits as a panzer commander on the Eastern Front. Hoth commanded the 3rd Panzer Group during Operation Barbarossa in 1941, and the 4th Panzer Army later during the Wehrmacht’s 1942 summer offensive. Following the encirclement of the 6th Army in Stalingrad in November 1942, Hoth’s panzer army unsuccessfully attempted to relieve it during Operation Wintergewitter. After Stalingrad, Hoth was involved in the Kursk counter offensive in the summer of 1943 and the Battle of Kiev. The Fourth Panzer Army under his command at Kursk was the largest tank formation ever assembled. Hoth was dismissed from command by Adolf Hitler in 1943, only to be reinstated for a short time during the last weeks of the war. After the war, he served six years in prison for war crimes, and became a writer on military history.

Hans-Valentin Hube

Hans-Valentin Hube (29 October 1890 – 21 April 1944) was a German general who served in the German Army during the First and Second World Wars. He was one of 27 people to be awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub, Schwertern und Brillanten). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade the Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. At the time of its presentation to Hube it was Germany’s highest military decoration. He died in an airplane crash in April 1944. Hube was nicknamed der Mensch (“The Man”) by his troops during the Second World War.

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German Military History with a focus on World War 2 History including other areas of German History