World War 2 Generals – W thru Z

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Walter Warlimont

Walter Warlimont (3 October 1894 – 9 October 1976) was a German officer and war criminal known for his role as a deputy chief in the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW), Germany’s Supreme Armed Forces Command during World War II.

Helmuth Weildling

Helmuth Otto Ludwig Weidling (2 November 1891 – 17 November 1955) was a general in the German Army (Wehrmacht Heer) before and during World War II. Weidling was the last commander of the Berlin Defence Area during the Battle of Berlin, and led the defence of the city against Soviet forces, finally surrendering just before the end of World War II in Europe. During his military career, he was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Walther Wenck

Walther Wenck (18 September 1900 – 1 May 1982) was the youngest general in the German Army during World War II. At the end of the war, he commanded the German Twelfth Army. Wenck ordered his army to surrender to forces of the United States in order to avoid capture by the Soviets. Before surrendering, Wenck played an important, if unsuccessful, part in the Battle of Berlin, and through his efforts aided thousands of German refugees in escaping the Red Army. He was known during the war as “The Boy General”.

Maximilian Wengler

Maximilian Wengler (14 January 1890 – 25 April 1945) was a German Insurance broker, serving as a general during World War II and recipient of the coveted Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Wengler took command of the 83. Infanterie-Division on 27 March 1945 in the area of Gotenhafen. The division, after escaping the encirclement of the city, fought its way to Oxhöfter Kämpe and Pillau-Neutief. Here Wengler and numerous men of his staff were killed by an aerial bomb on 25 April 1945. His wife had also been killed in the aerial bombardment of Dresden in early 1945.

Kurt Zeitzler

Kurt Zeitzler (June 9, 1895 – September 25, 1963) was a top German general during World War II. He was almost exclusively a staff officer, not a commander, serving as chief of staff in a corps, army, and army group. In September 1942, he was selected by Adolf Hitler as Chief of the Army General Staff, serving directly under Hitler as commander-in-chief of the Army. Zeitzler replaced Franz Halder, who had criticized some of Hitler’s plans and orders. Zeitzler too came to argue with Hitler, and retired in July 1944, complaining of illness. Zeitzler was regarded as an energetic and efficient staff officer, noted for his ability in managing the movement of large mobile formations.

Hans Zorn

Hans Wilhelm Karl Zorn (27 October 1891 – 2 August 1943) was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Hans Zorn was killed on 2 August 1943 by Soviet fire during Operation Kutuzov. He was posthumously awarded the Oak leaves to his Knight’s Cross on 3 September 1943.

Other Generals:

  • Alfred Jacob
  • Hellmuth Nickelmann

Other Photos

German Military History with a focus on World War 2 History including other areas of German History