Leading Figures of Nazi Germany

Just Click on Any Picture Below to Make it Large for Viewing!!

Hans Biebow

Hans Biebow (December 18, 1902 – June 23, 1947) was the chief of German Nazi administration of the Łódź Ghetto in occupied Poland.

Hugo Blaschke

Dr. Hugo Johannes Blaschke (14 November 1881 – 6 December 1959) was a German dental surgeon notable for being Adolf Hitler’s personal dentist from 1933 to April 1945 and for being the chief dentist on the staff of Heinrich Himmler.

Albert Bormann

Albert Bormann (2 September 1902 – 8 April 1989) was a German National Socialist Motor Corps (NSKK) officer, who rose to the rank of Gruppenführer (Generalleutnant) during World War II. Bormann served as an adjutant to Adolf Hitler, and was the younger brother of Martin Bormann.

Martin Bormann

Martin Bormann (17 June 1900 – 2 May 1945) was a prominent Nazi official. He became head of the Party Chancellery (Parteikanzlei) and private secretary to Adolf Hitler. He was almost always at his Führer’s side. Hitler typically did not issue written orders, but gave them verbally at meetings or in phone conversations; he also had Bormann convey orders. He gained Hitler’s trust and derived immense power within the Third Reich by using his position to control the flow of information and access to Hitler. Bormann earned many enemies, including Joseph Goebbels, Hermann Göring, Heinrich Himmler, Alfred Rosenberg, Robert Ley, Hans Frank, and Albert Speer.

Philipp Bouhler

Philipp Bouhler (11 September 1899 – 19 May 1945) was a senior Nazi Party official who was both a Reichsleiter (National Leader) and Chief of the Chancellery of the Führer of the NSDAP. He was also an SS-Obergruppenführer in the Allgemeine SS who was responsible for the Nazi Aktion T4 euthanasia program that killed more than 70,000 handicapped adults and children in Nazi Germany, as well as co-initiator of Aktion 14f13, also called “Sonderbehandlung” (“special treatment”), that killed 15,000–20,000 concentration camp prisoners.

Bouhler was captured and arrested on 10 May 1945 by American troops. He committed suicide on 19 May 1945 while in the U.S. internment camp at Zell am See in Austria.

Wilhelm Brückner

Wilhelm Brückner (11 December 1884 in Baden-Baden – 18 August 1954 in Herbsdorf, Upper Bavaria) was until 1940 Adolf Hitler’s chief adjutant.

Josef Bürckel

Joseph Bürckel (30 March 1895, in Lingenfeld, Germersheim – 28 September 1944, in Neustadt an der Weinstraße) was a Nazi Germany politician and a member of the German parliament (the Reichstag). He was an early member of the Nazi party and was influential in the rise of the National Socialist movement.

Kurt Daluege

Kurt Daluege (15 September 1897 – 24 October 1946) was a German Nazi SS-Oberst-Gruppenführer and Generaloberst of the Police (ranks equivalent to colonel-general, or four-star General) as chief of the national uniformed Ordnungspolizei (Order Police), and ruled the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia as Deputy Protector after Reinhard Heydrich’s assassination. After the end of World War II, he was extradited to Czechoslovakia, convicted as a war criminal and executed in 1946.

Otto Dietrich

Jacob Otto Dietrich (31 August 1897 – 22 November 1952) was an SS-Obergruppenführer, the Press Chief of Nazi Germany, and a confidant of Adolf Hitler.

Franz Xaver Dorsch

Franz Xaver Dorsch (24 December 1899 – 8 November 1986) was a German civil engineer who became the chief engineer of the Organisation Todt (OT), a civil and military engineering group in Nazi Germany that was responsible for a huge range of engineering projects at home and in the territories occupied by the Germans during the Second World War. He played a leading role in many of the Third Reich’s biggest engineering projects, including the construction of the Siegfried Line (Westwall), the Atlantic Wall and numerous other fortifications in Germany and occupied Europe. Following the war, he founded the Dorsch Consult consulting engineering company in Wiesbaden.

Walther Funk

Walther Funk (18 August 1890 – 31 May 1960) was an economist and prominent Nazi official who served as Reich Minister for Economic Affairs from 1938 to 1945 and was tried and convicted as a major war criminal by the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg.

Hans Frank

Hans Michael Frank (23 May 1900 – 16 October 1946) was a German lawyer who worked for the Nazi Party during the 1920s and 1930s, and later became Adolf Hitler’s personal lawyer. After the invasion of Poland, Frank became Nazi Germany’s chief jurist in the occupied Poland “General Government” territory. During his tenure throughout World War II (1939–45), he instituted a reign of terror against the civilian population and became directly involved in the mass murder of Jews. At the Nuremberg trials, he was found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity and was executed.

Karl Hermann Frank

Karl Hermann Frank (24 January 1898 – 22 May 1946) was a prominent Sudeten German Nazi official in Czechoslovakia prior to and during World War II and an SS-Obergruppenführer. He was executed by hanging after World War II for his role in organizing the massacres of the people of the Czech villages of Lidice and Ležáky.

Leopold Gutterer

Leopold Gutterer (25. April 1902 in Baden-Baden ; † 27. December 1996 in Aachen ) was a Nazi official and politician. During the Nazi period he rose to the post of State Secretary of the Reich Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda , and was temporarily vice president of the Reich Chamber of Culture . Gutterer was a close confidant of Reich Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels .

Karl Hanke

Karl August Hanke, Reichsführer-SS und Chef der Deutschen Polizei (24 August 1903 – 8 June 1945) was an official of the Nazi Party (NSDAP). He served as governor (Gauleiter) of Lower Silesia from 1941 to 1945 and as the final Reichsführer-SS for a few days in 1945.

Konrad Henlein

Konrad Ernst Eduard Henlein (6 May 1898 – 10 May 1945) was a leading Sudeten German politician in Czechoslovakia. Upon the German occupation he joined the Nazi Party as well as the SS and was appointed Reichsstatthalter of the Sudetenland in 1939.

Rudolf Hess

Rudolf Walter Richard Heß, also spelled Hess (26 April 1894 – 17 August 1987), was a prominent politician in Nazi Germany. Appointed Deputy Führer to Adolf Hitler in 1933, he served in this position until 1941, when he flew solo to Scotland in an attempt to negotiate peace with the United Kingdom during World War II. He was taken prisoner and eventually was convicted of crimes against peace, serving a life sentence.

Hess enlisted in the 7th Bavarian Field Artillery Regiment as an infantryman at the outbreak of World War I. He was wounded several times over the course of the war, and won the Iron Cross, second class, in 1915. Shortly before the war ended, Hess enrolled to train as an aviator, but he saw no action in this role. He left the armed forces in December 1918 with the rank of Leutnant der Reserve.

In autumn 1919 Hess enrolled in the University of Munich, where he studied geopolitics under Karl Haushofer, a proponent of the concept of Lebensraum (“living space”), which later became one of the pillars of Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party; NSDAP) ideology. Hess joined the NSDAP on 1 July 1920, and was at Hitler’s side on 8 November 1923 for the Beer Hall Putsch, a failed Nazi attempt to seize control of the government of Bavaria. Whilst serving time in jail for this attempted coup, Hess helped Hitler write his opus, Mein Kampf, which became a foundation of the political platform of the NSDAP.

After the Nazi Seizure of Power in 1933, Hess was appointed Deputy Führer of the NSDAP and received a post in Hitler’s cabinet. He was the third most-powerful man in Germany, behind only Hitler and Hermann Göring. In addition to appearing on Hitler’s behalf at speaking engagements and rallies, Hess signed into law much of the legislation, including the Nuremberg Laws of 1935, that stripped the Jews of Germany of their rights in the lead-up to the Holocaust.

Hess continued to be interested in aviation, learning to fly the more advanced aircraft that were coming into development at the start of World War II. On 10 May 1941 he undertook a solo flight to Scotland, where he hoped to arrange peace talks with the Duke of Hamilton, whom he believed was prominent in opposition to the British government. Hess was immediately arrested on his arrival and was held in British custody until the end of the war, when he was returned to Germany to stand trial in the Nuremberg Trials of major war criminals in 1946. Throughout much of the trial, he claimed to be suffering from amnesia, but later admitted this was a ruse. Hess was convicted of crimes against peace and conspiracy with other German leaders to commit crimes and was transferred to Spandau Prison in 1947, where he served a life sentence. Repeated attempts by family members and prominent politicians to win him early release were blocked by the Soviet Union. Still in custody in Spandau, he died of an apparent suicide in 1987 at the age of 93. After his death the prison was demolished to prevent it from becoming a neo-nazi shrine.

Walther Hewel

Walther Hewel (2 January 1904 – 2 May 1945) was a German diplomat before and during World War II, an early and active member of the Nazi Party, and one of German dictator Adolf Hitler’s few personal friends.

Konstantin Hierl

Konstantin Hierl (24 February 1875 – 23 September 1955) was a major figure in the administration of Nazi Germany. He was the head of the Reichsarbeitsdienst (RAD) (Reich Labor Service) and an associate of Adolf Hitler before he came to national power.

Margarete Himmler (Boden)

Margarete Himmler (née Boden) also known as Marga Himmler (9 September 1893 – 25 August 1967) was the wife of Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler.

Robert Ley

Robert Ley (German: [ˈlaɪ]; 15 February 1890 – 25 October 1945) was a Nazi politician and head of the German Labour Front from 1933 to 1945. He committed suicide while awaiting trial at Nuremberg for war crimes.

Willy Liebel

Willy Liebel , born Friedrich Wilhelm Liebel, (31 August 1897 in Nuremberg ; † 20th April 1945) was a German politician (NSDAP) and March 16, 1933 to April 20, 1945 Mayor of the City of Nuremberg.

Viktor Lutze

Viktor Lutze (28 December 1890 – 2 May 1943) was the commander of the Sturmabteilung (“SA”) succeeding Ernst Röhm as Stabschef. He died from injuries received in a car accident. Lutze was given an elaborate state funeral in Berlin on 7 May 1943.

Max Moosbauer

Max Moosbauer (March 2 1892 in Passau, – November 10 1968) was a German politician and during the Nazi dictatorship Lord Mayor of the city of Passau.

Ludwig Müller

Ludwig Müller (23 June 1883 – 31 July 1945) was a German theologian and leading member of the “German Christians” (German: Deutsche Christen) faith movement. In 1933 he was imposed by the Nazi government as Reichsbischof (Reich Bishop) of the German Evangelical Church (German: Deutsche Evangelische Kirche).

Hanna Reitsch

Hanna Reitsch (29 March 1912 – 24 August 1979) was Germany’s most famous female aviator and test pilot, starting in the early 1930s. During the Nazi era she served as an international representative for the regime. In the 1960s, she was sponsored by the West German foreign office as a technical adviser in Ghana and elsewhere.

She was the only woman awarded the Iron Cross First Class and the Luftwaffe Pilot/Observer Badge in Gold with Diamonds during World War II. She set more than 40 altitude and endurance women’s records in gliding before and after World War II. In the 1960s, she founded a gliding school in Ghana, where she worked for Kwame Nkrumah.

Ernst Röhm

Ernst Julius Günther Röhm (German pronunciation: [ˈɛɐ̯nst ˈʁøːm]; 28 November 1887 – 1 July 1934) was a German officer in the Bavarian Army and later an early Nazi leader. He was a co-founder of the Sturmabteilung (“Storm Battalion”; SA), the Nazi Party militia, and later was its commander. In 1934, as part of the Night of the Long Knives, he was executed on Adolf Hitler and Heinrich Himmler’s orders as a potential rival.

Alfred Rosenberg

Alfred Ernst Rosenberg (12 January 1893 – 16 October 1946) was a Baltic German philosopher and an influential ideologue of the Nazi Party. Rosenberg was first introduced to Adolf Hitler by Dietrich Eckart and later held several important posts in the Nazi government. He is considered one of the main authors of key National Socialist ideological creeds, including its racial theory, persecution of the Jews, Lebensraum, abrogation of the Treaty of Versailles, and opposition to degenerate modern art. He is known for his rejection of and hatred for Christianity, having played an important role in the development of German Nationalist Positive Christianity. At Nuremberg, he was sentenced to death and executed by hanging for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Hauptdienstleiter Karl-Otto Saur

Karl-Otto Saur (February 16, 1902 in Düsseldorf – July 28, 1966 in Pullach) was State Secretary in the Reich Ministry for armaments and war production in Germany during the Nazi era and de jure last defence minister of the Third Reich.

Arthur Seyss-Inquart

Arthur Seyss-Inquart (in German: Seyß-Inquart; 22 July 1892 – 16 October 1946) was an Austrian Nazi politician who served as Chancellor of Austria for two days – from 11 to 13 March 1938 – before the Anschluss annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany, signing the constitutional law as acting head of state upon the resignation of President Wilhelm Miklas.

During World War II, he served the Third Reich in the General Government of Poland and as Reichskommissar in the Netherlands. At the Nuremberg trials, he was found guilty of crimes against humanity and sentenced to death.

Wilhelm Schepmann

Wilhelm Schepmann (17 June 1894 – 26 July 1970) was an Sturmabteilung (SA) general (Obergruppenführer) in Nazi Germany and the last Stabschef (Chief of Staff) of the Nazi Stormtroopers.

Dr. Paul Otto Schmidt

Paul-Otto Schmidt (23 June 1899 – 21 April 1970) was an interpreter in the German foreign ministry from 1923-1945. During his career he served as the translator for Neville Chamberlain’s negotiations with Adolf Hitler over the Munich Agreement, the British Declaration of War and the surrender of France.

Julius Streicher

Julius Streicher (12 February 1885 – 16 October 1946) was a prominent Nazi prior to World War II. He was the founder and publisher of Der Stürmer newspaper, which became a central element of the Nazi propaganda machine. His publishing firm also released three anti-Semitic books for children, including the 1938 Der Giftpilz (“The Toadstool” or “The Poison-Mushroom”), one of the most widespread pieces of propaganda, which purported to warn about insidious dangers Jews posed by using the metaphor of an attractive yet deadly mushroom. After the war, he was convicted of crimes against humanity and executed.

Kurt Tank

Kurt Waldemar Tank (24 February 1898 – 5 June 1983) was a German aeronautical engineer and test pilot who led the design department at Focke-Wulf from 1931 to 1945. He was responsible for the creation of several important Luftwaffe aircraft of World War II, including the Fw 190 fighter aircraft, the Ta 152 fighter-interceptor, and the Fw 200 Condor airliner. After the war, Tank spent two decades designing aircraft abroad, working first in Argentina and then in India, before returning to Germany in the late 1960s to work as a consultant for Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm (MBB).

Fritz Todt

Fritz Todt (4 September 1891 – 8 February 1942) was a German engineer and senior Nazi figure, the founder of Organisation Todt. He died in a plane crash during World War II.

Richard Vogt

Richard Vogt (19 December 1894 – January 1979) was a German engineer and aircraft designer. He is well known as a designer of unique warplanes, including an asymmetrically-shaped reconnaissance aircraft and a nuclear-powered bomber, during and after World War II.

Franz Ritter von Epp

Franz Xaver Ritter von Epp (16 October 1868 – 31 December 1946) was a regular officer in the Imperial German Army of the early part of the 20th century, who rose to the office of Reichsstatthalter of Bavaria, a position of dictatorial power, under the Nazis.

Joachim von Ribbentrop

Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm Joachim von Ribbentrop (30 April 1893 – 16 October 1946) was Foreign Minister of the German Reich from 1938 until 1945. A businessman, he was appointed German Ambassador to Britain in 1936, serving in London.

Ribbentrop first came to Adolf Hitler’s notice as a well-travelled businessman with more knowledge of the outside world than most senior Nazis, and apparently an authority on world affairs. He offered his house for the secret meetings in January 1933 that resulted in Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor. He became a close confidant of the Führer, to the disgust of long-serving party members, who thought him superficial and lacking in talent. Despite this, he was appointed as Ambassador to Britain in 1936, and then Foreign Minister in February 1938.

In the run-up to World War II, he played a key role in brokering the Pact of Steel (with fascist Italy) and the Soviet–German non-aggression pact, known as the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact. After 1941, Ribbentrop’s influence declined.

Arrested in June 1945, he was tried at the Nuremberg Trials and convicted of war crimes for his role in starting World War II and enabling the Holocaust. On 16 October 1946 he became, due to Hermann Göring’s suicide moments before, the first of those sentenced to death to be hanged.

Baldur von Schirach

Baldur Benedikt von Schirach (9 May 1907 – 8 August 1974) was a Nazi politician who is best known for his role as the Nazi Party’s national youth leader and head of the Hitler Youth from 1931 to 1940. He later served as Gauleiter and Reichsstatthalter (“Reich Governor”) of Vienna. After World War II, he was convicted of crimes against humanity in the Nuremberg trial.

Hans von Tschammer und Osten

Hans von Tschammer und Osten (25 October 1887 – 25 March 1943) was a German sport official, SA leader and a member of the Reichstag for the Nazi Party of Nazi Germany. He was married to Sophie Margarethe von Carlowitz.

Hans von Tschammer und Osten led the German Sports Office Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (DRA) “German Reich Commission for Physical Exercise” after the Nazi seizure of power in 1933. In July the same year, Hans von Tschammer took the title of Reichssportführer, “Reich Sports Leader”, and the whole sports sphere in Germany was placed under his control. He re-established the organization he led, transforming it into the Sports governing body of the Third Reich, Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen (DRL) “Sports League of the German Reich”. In 1937, it was renamed Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen “National-Socialist Sports League of the German Reich”. von Tschammer held the high-profile post of Reichssportführer until his death in 1943.

Fritz Wächtler

Fritz Wächtler (7 January 1891 – 19 April 1945) was a Nazi German politician and Gauleiter of the eastern Bavarian administrative region of Gau Bayreuth. Trained as a primary school teacher, he also became head of the National Socialist Teachers League (NSLB) in 1935. During World War II, he held the honorary rank of SS-Obergruppenführer and Reich Defense Commissar of Bayreuth. Prone to alcoholic outbursts and unpopular with the local residents, he eventually ran afoul of Martin Bormann in a political intrigue. Wächtler was shot on the orders from the Führerbunker near the end of the war in April, 1945.

Adolf Wagner

Adolf Wagner (1 October 1890 in Algrange, Alsace-Lorraine – 12 April 1944 in Bad Reichenhall) was a German soldier and high-ranking Nazi Party official born in Algrange, Alsace-Lorraine.

Karl Weinrich

Karl Weinrich (2 December 1887 in Molmeck – 22 July 1973 in Hausen) was NSDAP Gauleiter of Kurhessen.

Karl Weinrich was a member of the Nazi Party from August 1922. From 1925 to 1927, he was the NSDAP’s Gau Treasurer. From 1930 to 1933, he was a member of the Prussian Landtag, and as of 12 November 1933 a member of the Reichstag for the electoral district of Hesse-Nassau. He was from 1928 to 1943 Gauleiter of Kurhessen. Shortly after the bomb attack of 22 October 1943 on Kassel, which destroyed the whole inner city, he was stripped of his office. His successor was Karl Gerland. Weinrich who was removed from his position because of incompetence during a bombing raid on Kassel, survived the war, was sentenced to a ten-year prison term in 1949 and died in 1973.

Horst Wessel

Horst Ludwig Georg Erich Wessel (9 October 1907 – 23 February 1930) was a German Nazi Party (NSDAP) activist known for writing the lyrics to the “Horst-Wessel-Lied”. His death in 1930 was used by the party for propaganda purposes.

Wessel first joined the German National People’s Party (DNVP), but by 1926 was removed for being too extremist. He then joined the NSDAP, where he wrote songs for Nazi events. He rose to command several SA squads and districts. On 14 January 1930, he was shot in the head by two members of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD). Albrecht Höhler was arrested and charged with his murder. He was initially sentenced to six years in prison, but was executed after the Nazis came to power. Wessel’s funeral was given wide attention in Berlin, with many of the Nazi elite in attendance. After his death, he became a major Nazi propaganda symbol. His name was used for several civilian and military purposes during the time of the Third Reich.

Others Figures:

39

German Military History with a focus on World War 2 History including other areas of German History