Update 11-18 : New Pictures Added to the Website

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New Pictures have been added to the Website:

• German Heer (Army) Photos
• Tiger 1 Replica
• Bundeswehr Military History Museum
• Paintings & Art
• World War 2 Officers, NCO’s, Etc.
• War Medals and Decorations
• Annexation of the Sudentenland
• Bundeswehr

New Pages has been added to the website:

  • Arnhem War Museum – Netherlands

Enjoy!

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Update 11-15 : New Pictures Added to the Website

 

16New Pictures have been added to the Pages:

  • Replica Uniforms made for Reenacting or Collecting
  • My Collection of Memorabilia
  • Battle of Berlin
  • German Heer (Army) Photos
  • German WW2 Medical Korps
  • Tiger 2 – King Tiger, Konigstiger, Royal Tiger, Bengal Tiger
  • Panther
  • Panzer II
  • Tiger 1 Replica
  • Kreigsmarine (Navy)
  • Paintings & Art
  • World War 2 Propaganda
  • General Heinz Guderian
  • World War 2 Officers, NCO’s, Etc.
  • War Medals and Decorations
  • Berlin
  • Order of Battle – Waffen-SS Divisions

New Pages have been added to the website:

  • Individual Re-Enactment Impressions
  • Special Collection of Photos from the Eastern Front

Enjoy!

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Brits sink the Battleship Tirpitz

Norwegen, Schlachtschiff, Zerstörer

Nov 12, 1944:

Brits sink the Battleship Tirpitz

On this day in 1944, 32 British Lancaster bombers attack and sink the mighty German battleship Tirpitz.

In January 1942, Hitler ordered the Germany navy to base the Tirpitz in Norway, in order to attack Soviet convoys transporting supplies from Iceland to the USSR. The Tirpitz also prevented British naval forces from making their way to the Pacific. Winston Churchill summed up the situation this way: “The destruction or even crippling of this ship is the greatest event at the present time… The whole strategy of the war turns at this period on this ship…”

Attacks had already been made against the Tirpitz. RAF raids were made against it in January 1942, but they failed to damage it. Another raid was made in March; dozens of RAF bombers sought out the Tirpitz, which was now reinforced with cruisers, pocket battleships, and destroyers. All of the British bombers, once again, missed their target.

Sporadic attacks continued to be made against the German battleship, including an attempt in October 1942 to literally drive a two-man craft up to the ship and plant explosives on the Tirpitz’s hull. This too failed because of brutal water conditions and an alert German defense. But in September 1943, six midget British subs set out to take the Tirpitz down for good. The midgets had to be towed to Norway by conventional subs. Only three of the six midgets made it to their target. This time, they were successful in attaching explosives to the Tirpitz’s keel and doing enough damage to put it out of action for six months. Two British commanders and four crewmen were taken captive by the Germans and spent the rest of the war as POWs.

But it wasn’t until November 1944 that the Tirpitz was undone permanently. As the battleship lay at anchor in Norway’s Tromso Fjord, 32 British Lancaster bombers, taking off from Scotland, attacked. Each bomber dropped a 12,000-pound Tallboy bomb and two hit their target, causing the Tirpitz to capsize, and killing almost 1,000 crewmen.

Ironically, the mighty Tirpitz fired its guns only once in aggression during the entire extent of the war-against a British coaling station on the island of Spitsbergen.

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Update 11-12 : New Pictures Added to the Website

  • Replica Uniforms made for Reenacting or Collecting
  • My Collection of Items
  • Operation Barbarossa – Invasion of the Soviet Union
  • German WW2 Medical Korps
  • Tiger 1
  • Panther
  • Tiger Replica
  • Deutsches Panzermuseum – German Tank Museum
  • Paintings & Art
  • World War 2 Field Marshalls
  • World War 2 Officers, NCO’s, Etc.
  • War Medals and Decorations
  • Bundeswehr

Enjoy!

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25th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall!

Nov 9, 1989:

25th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall!

East German officials today opened the Berlin Wall, allowing travel from East to West Berlin. The following day, celebrating Germans began to tear the wall down. One of the ugliest and most infamous symbols of the Cold War was soon reduced to rubble that was quickly snatched up by souvenir hunters.

The East German action followed a decision by Hungarian officials a few weeks earlier to open the border between Hungary and Austria. This effectively ended the purpose of the Berlin Wall, since East German citizens could now circumvent it by going through Hungary, into Austria, and thence into West Germany. The decision to open the wall was also a reflection of the immense political changes taking place in East Germany, where the old communist leadership was rapidly losing power and the populace was demanding free elections and movement toward a free market system.

The action also had an impact on President George Bush and his advisors. After watching television coverage of the delirious German crowds demolishing the wall, many in the Bush administration became more convinced than ever that Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev’s statements about desiring a new relationship with the West must be taken more seriously. Unlike 1956 and 1968, when Soviet forces ruthlessly crushed protests in Hungary and Czechoslovakia, respectively, Gorbachev actually encouraged the East German action. As such, the destruction of the Berlin Wall was one of the most significant actions leading to the end of the Cold War.

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Beer Hall Putsch

Nov 9, 1923:

Beer Hall Putsch

In Munich, armed policeman and troops loyal to Germany’s democratic government crush the Beer Hall Putsch, the first attempt by the Nazi Party at seizing control of the German government.

After World War I, the victorious allies demanded billions of dollars in war reparations from Germany. Efforts by Germany’s democratic government to comply hurt the country’s economy and led to severe inflation. The German mark, which at the beginning of 1921 was valued at five marks per dollar, fell to a disastrous four billion marks per dollar in 1923. Meanwhile, the ranks of the nationalist Nazi Party swelled with resentful Germans who sympathized with the party’s bitter hatred of the democratic government, leftist politics, and German Jews. In early November 1923, the government resumed war reparation payments, and the Nazis decided to strike.

Hitler planned a coup against the state government of Bavaria, which he hoped would spread to the dissatisfied German army, which in turn would bring down the central, democratic government. Same question as above. On the evening of November 8, Nazi forces under Hermann Goering surrounded the Munich beer hall where Bavarian government officials were meeting with local business leaders. A moment later, Hitler burst in with a group of Nazi storm troopers, discharged his pistol into the air, and declared that “the national revolution has begun.” Threatened at gunpoint, the Bavarian leaders reluctantly agreed to support Hitler’s new regime.

In the early morning of November 9, however, the Bavarian leaders repudiated their coerced support of Hitler and ordered a rapid suppression of the Nazis. At dawn, government troops surrounded the main Nazi force occupying the War Ministry building. A desperate Hitler responded by leading a march toward the center of Munich in a last-ditch effort to rally support. Near the War Ministry building, 3,000 Nazi marchers came face to face with 100 armed policemen. Shots were exchanged, and 16 Nazis and three policemen were killed. Hermann Goering was shot in the groin, and Hitler suffered a dislocated elbow but managed to escape.

Three days later, Hitler was arrested. Convicted of treason, he was given the minimum sentence of five years in prison. He was imprisoned in the Landsberg fortress and spent his time writing his autobiography, Mein Kampf, and working on his oratorical skills. Political pressure from the Nazis forced the Bavarian government to commute Hitler’s sentence, and he was released after serving only nine months. In the late 1920s, Hitler reorganized the Nazi Party as a fanatical mass movement that was able to gain a majority in the Reichstag in 1932. By 1934, Hitler was the sole master of a nation intent on war and genocide.

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Update 11-9 : New Pictures Added to the Website

  • Replica Uniforms made for Reenacting or Collecting
  • Invasion of Poland
  • Battle of Dunkirk
  • Battle of Normandy
  • Battle of Berlin
  • German Heer (Army) Photos
  • Afrika Korps
  • German WW2 Medical Korps
  • Tiger 1
  • Panzer IV
  • Other Panzer Types
  • Jagdtiger
  • Hetzer
  • Kfz. 251
  • Tiger 1 Replica
  • Battleship Bismarck
  • WW2 U-Boats plus Others
  • Luftwaffe Varied Plane Types
  • Weapons of WW2
  • Paintings & Art
  • World War 2 Propaganda
  • The Tank Museum (Formerly Bovington Tank Museum) – England
  • World War 2 Officers, NCO’s, Etc.
  • War Medals and Decorations
  • Historic Symbols of German History
  • World War 1 – The Great War
  • Bundeswehr
  • Berlin
  • Fuhrer Adolf Hitler
  • Order of Battle – Waffen-SS Divisions
  • Nazi German Organizations

Enjoy!

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