World War 2 Generals – A thru B / Weltkrieg 2 Generäle – A durch B

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Karl Allmendinger

Karl Allmendinger, 3 February 1891 – 2 October 1965, was a German general of Infantry, serving during World War I and World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Allmendinger was the son of Karl Allmendinger (1863 – 1946), alias “Felix Nabor” a teacher, poet and writer. In the Army’s reserve since 1944, he was arrested by U.S. forces in 1945 but released in 1946.

Curt Badinski

Curt Badinski, 17 May 1890 – 27 February 1966, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II who held several divisional commands. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Kurt Badinski was captured by American troops in August 1944 in the Falaise Pocket. He was held until 1947.

Franz Bäke

Generalmajor der Reserve Dr. med. dent. Franz Bäke, 28 February 1898 – 12 December 1978, was a German Army officer and panzer ace. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Bäke fought during World War I but rose to fame for his command of heavy panzer forces in World War II. A reservist, Bäke was a dentist in civilian life, having received his doctorate in dental medicine in 1923.

Hermann Balck

Hermann Balck, 7 December 1897 – 29 November 1982, was an officer of the German army who served in both World War I and World War II, rising to the rank of General der Panzertruppe. He was highly decorated, receiving the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub, Schwertern und Brillanten), an award created to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or outstanding military leadership. At the time of its presentation to Balck, it was Germany’s highest military decoration. His father, William Balck, was a Generalleutnant in the German army and prominent writer on tactics before and immediately after the First World War. He was a recipient of the Knight of the Order Pour le Mérite, which he was awarded while commanding an infantry division.

Rudolf Bamler

Rudolf Karl Johannes Bamler, 6 May 1896, in Osterburg (Altmark), † 13 March 1972, in Groß Glienicke, Kreis Nauen, was a German army officer since 1943 Lieutenant General. In the First World War, he served as an officer in the Prussian army, then in the Reichswehr and the Wehrmacht.

During the Second World War Bamler acted as Chief of the General Staff at various General Commands. From June 1944, he commanded the 12th Infantry Division. After being defeated in the same month in the course of Operation Bagration, he fell into Soviet captivity. There Bamler joined the National Committee Free Germany (NKFD) and the League of German Officers (BDO).

Bamler was released after his captivity in April 1950 in the German Democratic Republic (GDR). In the Kasernierte People’s Police (CIP), Bamler rose to the rank of Major General. His release took place in connection with the popular uprising of June 17, 1953. From 1956, Bamler worked for the Ministry of National Defense (MfNV) as a freelance researcher and later on unconfirmed information for the Ministry of State Security (MfS). Bamler gained notoriety from the early 1960s as a publicist of the Association of Former Officers (EO). In addition, Bamler served with Walter Freytag, Otto Korfes, Arno von Lenski, Vincenz Mueller, Karl Hans Walther and Hans Wulz which were six other former generals of the Wehrmacht in the KVP and the later National People’s Army (NVA).

Erich Bärenfänger

Erich Bärenfänger, 12 January 1915 – 2 May 1945, was an officer in the German Army (Wehrmacht Heer) during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Hans-Joachim Barnewitz

Hans-Joachim Barnewitz, 18 August 1892 in Charlottenburg 19 April 1965 in Lübbecke, was a German Generalleutnant, medical officer, and physician in the Second World War.

Barnewitz entered the First World War as a volunteer in the Prussian Army. On March 1, 1938, he was promoted to field medical officer. As part of the general mobilization, Barnewitz was appointed on August 26, 1939, divisional doctor of the 228th Infantry Division, with whom he participated in the Polish campaign. On February 5, 1940, he moved in the same function to the 6th Infantry Division. With this, he participated in the Western Campaign. On June 19, 1941, Barnewitz was a senior medical officer at the liaison officer to the Royal Italian High Command in Africa. There he rose on October 13, 1941, to the corps doctor of the German Afrika Korps. On September 5, 1942, he was in the Führerreservetransferred from the High Command of the Army and appointed on May 10, 1943 commander of the medical department Thorn. On 2 June 1944 Barnewitz was awarded the German Cross in Silver.

Relocated to the Führerreserve on 1 November 1944, Barnewitz served during this time in the Wehrkreiskommando XX and was at the same time deputy corps physician of the XII. Army Korps where he was charged with running the daily affairs. On January 1, 1945, he finally became a corps doctor and was at the same time the ward doctor of the XII. On May 8, 1945, he was taken as an Allied prisoner of war, from which he was released in 1946.

Fritz Bayerlein

Fritz Hermann Michael Bayerlein, 14 January 1899 – 30 January 1970, was an officer in the German Army during the Second World War. He served as the operations officer for a number of significant units, most prominently with Erwin Rommel in the Afrika Korps. On his return to Europe, he was made divisional commander for the 3rd Panzer Division, and later the Panzer Lehr Division. In the closing stages of the war, he commanded the LIII Army Corps. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Ludwig Beck

Generaloberst Ludwig August Theodor Beck, 29 June 1880 – 20 July 1944, was a German general and Chief of the German General Staff during the early years of the Nazi regime in Germany before World War II. Ludwig Beck was never a member of the Nazi Party, though in the early 1930s he supported Adolf Hitler’s forceful denunciation of the Versailles Treaty and belief in the need for Germany to rearm. Beck had grave misgivings regarding the Nazi demand that all German officers swear an oath of fealty to the person of Hitler in 1934, though he believed that Germany needed strong government and that Hitler could successfully provide this so long as he was influenced by traditional elements within the military rather than the SA and SS. In serving as Chief of Staff of the German Army between 1935 and 1938, Beck became increasingly disillusioned in this respect, standing in opposition to the increasing authoritarianism of the Nazi regime and Hitler’s aggressive foreign policy. It was due to public foreign policy disagreements with Hitler that Beck resigned as Chief of Staff in August 1938. From this point, Beck came to believe that Hitler could not be influenced for good and that both Hitler and the Nazi party needed to be removed from government. He became a major leader within the conspiracy against Hitler and would have been provisional head of state had the 20 July plot succeeded. When the plot failed, Beck was arrested and he offered to commit suicide with a pistol.

Hermann-Heinrich Behrend

Hermann-Heinrich Behrend, 25 August 1898 – 19 June 1987, was a German Generalmajor, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Wilhelm Berlin

Wilhelm Otto Julius Berlin, 28 April 1889 – 15 September 1987, was a highly decorated General der Artillerie in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Wilhelm Berlin was captured by American troops in May 1945 and remained in captivity until 1947.

Clemens Betzel

Clemens Betzel, 9 June 1895 – 27 March 1945, was a German General in the Wehrmacht of the Third Reich who commanded the 4. Panzer-Division during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves.

Johannes Blaskowitz

Johannes Blaskowitz, 10 July 1883 – 5 February 1948, was a German general during World War II and recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Commander in Chief in Occupied Poland in 1939–1940, he had written several memoranda for the German High Command protesting the SS atrocities. He was dismissed, but then re-appointed, no longer calling Nazi policies into question. Charged with war crimes in the High Command Trial at Nuremberg, he committed suicide on 5 February 1948.

Johannes Block

Johannes Block, 17 November 1894 – 26 January 1945, was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during World War II who held commands at division and corps level. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Johannes Block was killed on 26 January 1945 near Kielce, Poland during the Vistula-Oder Offensive.

Franz Böhme*

Franz Friedrich Böhme, 15 April 1885 – 29 May 1947, was an Austrian general in the Wehrmacht during World War II, serving as Commander of the XVIII Mountain Corps, Hitler’s Plenipotentiary Commanding General (Bevollmächtigter Kommandierender General) in the Balkans, and commander-in-chief in German-occupied Norway during World War II. Böhme stood trial in Nuremberg in the Hostages Trial for possibly ordering reprisals against Serbian civilians. He committed suicide in prison.

 Erich Brandenberger

Adolf Robert Erich Brandenberger, 15 July 1892 – 21 June 1955, was a German General der Panzertruppe. He was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Heinz Brandt

Generalmajor Heinz Brandt, 11 March 1907 – 21 July 1944, was a German officer during World War II who served as an aide to General Adolf Heusinger, the head of the operations unit of the General Staff. He may have inadvertently saved Adolf Hitler’s life, at the cost of his own, by moving the 20 July plot bomb planted by Claus von Stauffenberg.

Hermann Breith

Hermann Albert Breith, 7 May 1892 – 3 September 1964, was a German general of the Panzertruppe, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Breith commanded the III. Panzerkorps.

Walther Buhle

General Walther Buhle, 26 October 1894 – 28 December 1959, was an infantry General in the German army who was the Chief of the Army Staff of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht from 1942 and chief of armaments for the army in 1945.

Wilhelm Burgdorf

Wilhelm Emanuel Burgdorf, 15 February 1895 – 2 May 1945, was a German general. Born in Fürstenwalde, Burgdorf served as a commander and staff officer in the German Army during World War II.

Theodor Busse

Ernst Hermann August Theodor Busse, 15 December 1897 – 21 October 1986, was a German officer during World War I and World War II.

 

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