World War 2 Generals – C thru E / Weltkrieg 2 Generäle – C durch E

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Alexander Conrady

Alexander Conrady, 16 July 1903 – 21 December 1983, was a German general during World War II who commanded the 36th Infantry Division. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves of Nazi Germany. Conrady was taken prisoner by Soviet troops during Operation Bagration; he was released in 1955.

Ludwig Crüwell

Ludwig Crüwell, 20 March 1892 – 25 September 1958, was a general in the Afrika Korps of Nazi Germany during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. Crüwell surrendered to the British forces on 29 May 1942 and was interned at Trent Park, the British camp for high-ranking POWs where his conversations were subject to covert surveillance.

Karl Decker

Karl Gustav Adolf Decker, 30 November 1897 – 21 April 1945, was a German general in the infantry, serving during World War II. Trapped in the Ruhr Pocket, Decker committed suicide on 21 April 1945. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Walter Chales de Beaulieu

Walter Chales de Beaulieu, 14 June 1898 in Saalfeld – 26 August 1974 in Kressbronn am Bodensee, was a German lieutenant general in World War II and author.

Eduard Dietl

Eduard Dietl, 21 July 1890 – 23 June 1944, was a German general of World War II. He was born in Bad Aibling, Bavaria. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Walter Dornberger

Major-General Dr. Walter Robert Dornberger, 6 September 1895 – 27 June 1980, was a German Army artillery officer whose career spanned World Wars I and II. He was a leader of Germany’s V-2 rocket program and other projects at the Peenemünde Army Research Center.

Dornberger was born in Gießen and enlisted in 1914. In October 1918, as an artillery lieutenant Dornberger was captured by US Marines and spent two years in a French prisoner-of-war camp (mostly in solitary confinement because of repeated escape attempts). In the late 1920s, Dornberger completed an engineering course with distinction at the Berlin Technical Institute, and in the Spring of 1930, Dornberger graduated after five years with an MS degree in mechanical engineering from the Technische Hochschule Charlottenburg in Berlin. In 1935, Dornberger received an honorary doctorate, which Col. Karl Emil Becker arranged as Dean of the new Faculty of Military Technology at the TH Berlin.

Anton Dostler

Anton Dostler, 10 May 1891 – 1 December 1945, was a general of the infantry in the regular German Army during World War II. In the first Allied war trial after the war, Dostler was found guilty of war crimes and executed by firing squad.

Anton Dostler joined the German Army in 1910 and served as a junior officer during World War I. From the start of World War II to 1940, he served as chief of staff of the 7th Army. Subsequently, he commanded the 57th Infantry Division (1941–1942), the 163rd Infantry Division (1942) and after some temporary stand-ins at corps, was appointed commander of 75th Army Corps (Jan-July 1944) in Italy and then as commander of the Venetian Coast (Sept to Nov 1944) when its name was changed to 73rd Army Corps, at which he finished the war.

Johann Heinrich Eckhardt

Johann-Heinrich Eckhardt, 3 December 1896 – 15 May 1945, was a German general in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves of Nazi Germany. Eckhardt surrendered to the American troops on 8 May 1945 and died in custody on 15 May 1945.

Walter Elflein

Walter Elflein, 10 December 1914 – 30 December 2000, was a highly decorated Major der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Gerhard Engel

Gerhard Michael Engel, 13 April 1906 – 9 December 1976, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded several divisions after serving as adjutant to Adolf Hitler. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Gerhard Engel was captured by American troops in 1945 and was held until 1947.

Erwin Engelbrecht

Erwin Engelbrecht, 12 November 1891 in Wildpark Potsdam – 8 April 1964 in Munich, was a General der Artillerie in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

In January 1939, Engelbrecht was promoted to Major-General, in September 1942 to General of the Artillery. During 1939 – 1942, he was the commander of the 163rd Infantry Division (Engelbrecht Division); and later he was assigned to special forces.

On 9 April 1940, onboard the German cruiser Blücher, he led the staff of the forces designated to occupy Oslo during the invasion of Norway. When the ship was sunk, he managed to swim ashore. Along with hundreds of other survivors, Engelbrecht was detained by Norwegian guardsmen at a farm near Drøbak for several hours before being abandoned by their captors.

In 1941 his division was allowed to cross Sweden to join Finnish forces in Karelia, the only such large scale transit at the time.

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