World War 2 Generals – F thru G / 2. Weltkrieg Generäle – F durch G

Just Click on Any Picture Below to Make it Large for Viewing!!

 

Arthur Finger

Arthur Finger, 18 January 1898 – 27 January 1945, was a highly decorated Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Arthur Finger was killed on 27 January 1945 near Tschenstochau, Poland during the Vistula–Oder Offensive.

Maximilian Fretter-Pico

Maximilian Fretter-Pico, 6 February 1892 – 4 April 1984, was a German general during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves.

Fretter-Pico was born in Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Fretter-Pico entered service in 1910 with the Prussian Army and served in World War I. During the inter-war years, he remained in the German military; in 1938, he was posted to Turkey as a military attaché. During Operation Barbarossa, the 1941 invasion of the Soviet Union, Fretter-Pico commanded the 97th Jäger Division in Army Group South. On 27 December 1941, he was given command of XXX Corps, which participated in the Battle of Sevastopol in southern Ukraine. Fretter-Pico was promoted to a full general in June 1942. He remained the commanding officer of XXX Corps until mid-1944 and then commanded the 6th Army for the remainder of the year. In March 1945, he was given command of IX Corps, an under-strength reserve unit. He surrendered to the American Forces on 22 April 1945 and was interned until 1947. Fretter-Pico died at Bad Wiessee in Bavaria, Germany.

Friedrich Fromm

Friedrich Fromm, 8 October 1888 – 12 March 1945, was a German army general and officer. A recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross, he was executed for failing to act against the 20 July plot to assassinate Hitler.

Alfred Gause

Alfred Gause, 14 February 1896 – 30 September 1967, was a German general during World War II.

Gause took part in World War I and was awarded both the Iron Cross, both Second and First Class. In the interwar years, he was among the 4,000 officers selected to remain in the Reichswehr, the restricted sized German army. He served primarily on the staff of the First Prussian Engineer battalion.

During the Second World War, he was a highly valued staff officer. Gause was initially sent to Africa with a large staff by Oberkommando des Heeres (OKH), the German Army High Command, to act as a liaison officer with the Italian High Command, Comando Supremo. Gause had specific instructions not to place himself under the command of Erwin Rommel but did so when Rommel told him categorically that the command of all troops in Africa were vested in him. This was not correct, but Gause acceded to Rommel’s authority and served as his Chief of Staff. He proved invaluable to the famous desert commander, who was well known to direct his forces from the front and who frequently would lose touch with his command staff during operations. Gause spent two and a half years serving Rommel in the Afrika Korps. Though initially sent by OKH to keep an eye on the independent commander, they soon developed an excellent working relationship. In December 1941, Gause was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. In early May 1943, he was rotated into the officer reserve force and thus was off the continent when the Axis forces in Africa surrendered.

Gause rejoined Rommel in his postings in Italy and Northern France. In September 1944, he became Chief of Staff of the 6th Panzer Army, which he held through the end of November. In April, he was assigned to Generalkommando II Armeekorps in Kurland (General staff of Army Corps, Kurland). Alfred Gause was captured by Soviet troops in the Courland Pocket in 1945 and was a prisoner of the Soviets until his release in 1955.

Gustav Gihr

Gustav Gihr, born 18 August 1894 – 31 October 1959, was a German general in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany during World War II. He commanded several infantry divisions during the war before surrendering to the Red Army in 1944.

Karl Göbel

Karl Göbel, 20 January 1900 – 2 March 1945, was a Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Karl Göbel was wounded on 16 February 1945 in the Courland Pocket and died on 2 March 1945. He was posthumously promoted to Generalmajor.

Hans Gollnick

Hans Gollnick, 22 May 1892 – 15 February 1970, was a German general during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Friedrich Gollwitzer

Friedrich Gollwitzer, 27 April 1889 – 25 March 1977, was a general in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany who commanded the LIII Army Corps. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

Gollwitzer surrendered to the Soviet troops in June 1944 during the Vitebsk–Orsha Offensive. Convicted as a war criminal in the Soviet Union, he was held until October 1955. In West Germany, Gollwitzer was investigated for war crimes allegedly committed under his command during the 1939 invasion of Poland in which they were found to be baseless allegations.

Walter Gorn

Walter Gorn, 24 September 1898 – 10 July 1968, was a German general, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. At the Enns River, Austria, Gorn surrendered to Major General Stanley Eric Reinhart’s 261st Infantry Regiment.

Walther Graeßner

Walther Graeßner, 31 January 1891 – 16 July 1943, was a German general in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded the XII Army Corps. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. Graeßner was wounded in mid-February and later died of his wounds on 16 July 1943.

Anton Grasser

Anton Grasser, 3 November 1891 – 3 November 1976, was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded several corps. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Anton Grasser was captured by Allied troops in 1945 and was released in 1947. Anton Grasser joined the Bundesgrenzschutz (Federal Border Guards) in 1951, retiring in 1953.

In the 1950s, Grasser was involved in organizing an illegal underground army set up by German officers in the event of a Soviet invasion of West Germany.

Franz Griesbach

Franz Griesbach, 21 December 1892 – 24 September 1984, was a German Generalmajor, serving during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

12

0Shares

Leave a Reply

HSOGMH – Largest Collection of Photos and Images of German History in the World with a focus on World War II.