World War 2 Generals – I thru L / 2. Weltkrieg Generäle – I durch L

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Erwin Jaenecke*

Erwin Jaenecke, 22 April 1890 – 3 July 1960, was a highly decorated Generaloberst in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 9 October 1942. He held multiple commands from the 389. Infantry Division,  IV. Armeekorps to the 17th Army.

He was wounded at the Battle of Stalingrad and flown out as one of the last higher officers. In April 1943, he commanded the LXXXII Army Corps, and from June 25th the 17th Army in the Caucasus and later the Crimean Peninsula. In a 29 April 1944 meeting with Adolf Hitler in Berchtesgaden, Jaenecke insisted that Sevastopol should be evacuated. He was relieved of his command afterward.

Later, he was held responsible for the loss of Crimea, arrested in Romania, and court-martialed. Heinz Guderian was appointed as a special investigator in the case. Jaenecke was quietly acquitted in June 1944. Jaenecke was dismissed from the Heer on 31 January 1945. On 15 June 1945, he was arrested by the Soviet authorities and sentenced to death for his supposed crimes. His sentence was commuted to 25 years of hard labor. He was released in 1955.

Erich Jaschke*

Erich Jaschke, 11 May 1890 – 18 October 1961, was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 4 December 1941 and with Oak Leaves on 7 September 1943. He held multiple commands from the 20. Infantry Division to the LV. Armeekorps.

Hans Jordan*

Hans Jordan, 27 December 1892, Scheuern, Baden – 20 April 1975, was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 5 June 1940, with Oak Leaves on 16 January 1942, and the Swords on 20 April 1944. He held multiple commands from the 7. Infantry Division, VI Army Corps to the 9th Army.

Jordan was given command of the 9th Army on 20 May 1944. The Soviet offensive Operation Bagration began on 22 June 1944. In the northern sector, the Soviet offensive the 1st Belorussian Front under the command of Colonel-General Konstantin Rokossovsky breached the Jordan’s 9th Army defensive positions south and north of Babruysk. Jordan was unable to halt the Soviet offensive and Babruysk was encircled on 27 June 1944. Adolf Hitler made Jordan responsible for this defeat and released him of his command on 26 June, placing him on the Führerreserve.

Erich Kahsnitz

Erich Kahsnitz, 17 February 1898 – 29 July 1943, was a highly decorated Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during the Second World War. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross, which was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Kahsnitz was wounded on 5 July 1943, near Belgorod, during the Battle of Kursk. He died of his wounds on 29 July 1943 in Breslau and was posthumously promoted to Generalmajor.

Hans Källner

Hans Källner, 9 October 1898 – 18 April 1945,  was a German general during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. Källner was killed in action while visiting the front lines near Olomouc.

Hans Kamecke*

Hans Kamecke, 18 August 1890 – 16 October 1943, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 27 October 1943. He held commands of the 137. Infanterie-Division. Kamecke was killed on 16 October 1943 near Kolpen, Soviet Union.

Bodewin Keitel

Bodewin Claus Eduard Keitel, 25 December 1888 in Helmscherode, Germany – 29 July 1953 in Göttingen. He was a German officer, at the end of World War II he was General of the Infantry.

Werner Kempf

Werner Kempf, 9 March 1886 – 6 January 1964, was a German general during the Nazi era. He rose to corps-level command during World War II. Kempf is best known for commanding the Army Detachment Kempf during the Battle of Kursk.

Werner Kienitz*

Werner Kienitz, 3 June 1885 – 31 December 1959 was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 31 August 1941. He held multiple commands from the 24. Infantry Division and the XVII. Armeekorps.

Heinrich Kirchheim

Heinrich Kirchheim, 6 April 1882 – 14 December 1973, was a German Generalleutnant who served in both World War I and World War II. He is also one of few German officers who were awarded the Pour le Mérite and the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. He also served as a deputy member on the “Court of Military Honour,” a drumhead court-martial that expelled many of the officers involved in the July 20 Plot from the Army before handing them over to the People’s Court.

Friedrich Kirchner

Friedrich Kirchner, 26 March 1885 – 6 April 1960, was a German general during World War II who commanded 1st Panzer Division and the LVII Panzer Corps. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Günther Klammt

Günther Klammt, 9 May 1898 in Löwenberg in Silesia – 16 May 1971 in Lübeck, was a German officer, most recently Major General and last commander of the 260th Infantry Division of the Wehrmacht in World War II. He signed as one of 50 in Soviet captivity located generals calling the National Committee for a Free Germany.

Richard Koll

Richard Koll, 7 April 1897 – 13 May 1963, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded the 1. Panzer-Division. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Richard Koll was captured by British troops in 1945 and was released in 1946.

August Krakau

August Krakau, 12 September 1894 – 7 January 1975, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. August Krakau was captured by British troops in 1945 and was held until 1947.

Hans Kreysing

Hans Kreysing, 17 August 1890 – 14 April 1969, was a German general who commanded the 3. Gebirgs-Division. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Georg Koßmala

Georg Koßmala, 22 October 1896 – 18 March 1945, was a Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Georg Koßmala was killed on 18 March 1945 in Oberglogau in Lower Silesia.

Hans Krebs

Hans Krebs, 4 March 1898 – 2 May 1945, was a German Army (Wehrmacht Heer) general of infantry who served during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Franz Landgraf

Franz Landgraf, 16 July 1888 – 19 April 1944, was a general in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

Willy Langkeit

Willy Langkeit (B), 2 June 1907 – 27 October 1969, was a Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Willy Langkeit was taken prisoner by American troops in May 1945 and transferred to British custody later that month. He was held until 1947 and later joined the Bundesgrenzschutz (Federal Border Guards) in 1951, retiring in 1967.

Joachim Lemelsen

Joachim Lemelsen, 28 September 1888 – 30 March 1954,  was a German general during World War II who rose to army-level command.

During Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, troops of the XLVII Motorized Corps under his command executed the criminal Commissar Order, prompting Lemelsen to complain: “Soon the Russians will get to hear about the countless corpses lying along the routes taken by our soldiers (…). The result will be that the enemy will hide in the woods and fields and continue to fight–and we shall lose countless comrades”.

Georg Lindemann*

Georg Lindemann, 8 March 1884 – 25 September 1963, was a German Generaloberst during World War II. He commanded the 18th Army during the Soviet Kingisepp–Gdov Offensive.

In 1936, Lindemann was promoted to Generalmajor and given command of the 36th Infantry Division which took part in the Invasion of France. Lindemann was promoted to full General and given command of the L Army Corps. In June 1941, at the launch of Operation Barbarossa, Lindemann’s Corps was a part of Army Group North. Lindemann commanded the corps during the advance towards Leningrad. His unit was briefly shifted to the command of Army Group Centre during the Battle of Smolensk. Lindemann’s corps was then shifted back to Army Group North.

On 16 January 1942, Lindemann took the command of the 18th Army, a part of Army Group North. In the summer of 1942, he was promoted to Generaloberst. Lindemann commanded the 18th Army throughout the campaigns around Leningrad and during the January 1944 retreat from the Oranienbaum Bridgehead to Narva. He was promoted to command of Army Group North on 31 March 1944. On 4 July 1944, he was relieved and transferred to the Reserve Army. On 1 February 1945, he was appointed to the command of all German troops in Denmark as the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces in Denmark. Germany surrendered unconditionally in northwest Germany, the Netherlands, and Denmark on 5 May 1945. Lindemann was then given the task of dismantling the German occupation of Denmark until 6 June 1945, when he was arrested at his headquarters in Silkeborg. He was held in American custody until 1948. Lindemann died in 1963 in Freudenstadt, West Germany.

Gerhard Lindemann

Gerhard Heinrich Lindemann, 2 August 1896 – 28 April 1994 was a German Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves.

Lindemann surrendered to the Red Army in the course of the Soviet July 1944 Lvov–Sandomierz Offensive. Convicted as a war criminal in the Soviet Union, he was held until 1955.

Gerhard Lindner

Gerhard Lindner, 26 December 1896 – 3 June 1982, was a highly decorated Generalmajor in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 5 May 1945. He held multiple commands from the 346. Infantry Division and the SS Division Götz von Berlichingen.

Vollrath Lübbe

Vollrath Lübbe, 4 March 1894 – 4 April 1969, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded several divisions. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Vollrath Lübbe was captured by Soviet troops in February 1945 and was held until October 1955.

Walther Lucht*

Walter Lucht, 26 February 1882 – 18 March 1949, was a highly decorated General der Artillerie in the Heer during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. He was awarded the Knights Cross on 30 January 1943 and with Oak Leaves on 9 January 1945. He held multiple commands at the division, corps,  and army levels from the 87. Infantry Division, 336. Infantry Division,  LXVI Reservekorps, LXVI. Armeekorps to the 11th Armee.

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