World War 2 Generals – P thru R / Weltkrieg 2 Generäle – P durch R

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Max Pfeffer

Max Pfeffer, 12 June 1883 – 21 December 1955,  was a general in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany during World War II who commanded the IV Army Corps. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

Pfeffer surrendered to the Soviet forces at the conclusion of the Battle of Stalingrad in 1943. Convicted as a war criminal in the Soviet Union, he died in captivity in 1955.

Georg-Wilhelm Postel

Georg-Wilhelm Postel (25 April 1896 in Zittau – 20 September 1953 in Shakhty, Russia) was a general in the German Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Postel was taken prisoner of war on 30 August 1944 after the capitulation of Romania and sentenced to 25 years of forced labour on 4 June 1949. Postel died in custody on 20 September 1953 of Tuberculosis. He was interred on the prisoner of war cemetery in Shakhty row 3, grave 14.

Hermann Meyer-Rabingen

Hermann Meyer-Rabingen, 7 July 1887 – 21 February 1961, was a highly decorated Generalleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Erhard Raus

Erhard Raus, 8 January 1889 – 3 April 1956, was an Austrian Generaloberst (Colonel General) during World War II. He commanded the 6th Panzer Division during the early years of the war on the Eastern Front before taking Army and Army Group commands. Raus was one of three Austrians who rose to the rank of Colonel General within the German Wehrmacht. The other two were Alexander Löhr and Lothar Rendulic.

Hermann Recknagel

Hermann Recknagel, 18 July 1892, Hofgeismar – 23 January 1945, was a German general during World War II and recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Recknagel was shot on 23 January 1945 by partisans between Piotrków Trybunalski and Tomaszów Mazowiecki.

Georg Hans Reinhardt

Georg-Hans Reinhardt, 1 March 1887 – 23 November 1963, was a German general during World War II. He commanded Third Panzer Army from 1941 to 1944, and Army Group Centre in 1944 and 1945, reaching the rank of colonel general (Generaloberst).

Following the war, Reinhardt was tried in the High Command Trial, as part of the Subsequent Nuremberg Trials. He was found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity and sentenced to 15 years. He was released in 1952.

Otto Ernst Remer

Otto-Ernst Remer, 18 August 1912 – 4 October 1997, was a German Wehrmacht officer who played a decisive role in stopping the 1944 20 July Plot against Adolf Hitler. During the war he was wounded nine times in combat. After the war, he co-founded the Sozialistische Reichspartei (SRP) and advanced Holocaust denial. He is considered the “Godfather” of the post-war Nazi underground.

Lothar Rendulic

Lothar Rendulic, 23 October 1887 – 17 January 1971, was an army group commander in the Wehrmacht during World War II. Rendulic was one of three Austrians who rose to the rank of Generaloberst (senior general) in the German armed forces.

Rendulic was tried at the Subsequent Nuremberg Trials in 1948. Though acquitted of deliberate scorched earth tactics during the Lapland war, he was convicted of killing hostages in Yugoslavia at the Hostages Trial and imprisoned. After his release in 1951, he took up writing.

Franz Reuß

Franz Reuß (17 April 1904 – 5 June 1992) was a general in the German Luftwaffe during World War II. He was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross in July 1944. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Hellmuth Reymann

Hellmuth Reymann (24 November 1892 – 8 December 1988) was an officer in the German Army (Heer) during World War II. Reymann was one of the last commanders of the Berlin Defense Area during the final assault by Soviet forces on the city of Berlin.

Johann-Georg Richert

Johann-Georg Richert (14 April 1890 – 30 January 1946) was a German general during World War II. He commanded the 286th Security Division whose personnel committed numerous war crimes in occupied Belarus, in the Army Group Center Rear Area.

Richert was taken prisoner by Soviet troops on 8 May 1945. He was charged with war crimes and convicted by the Soviet Military Tribunal in the Minsk Trial. Richert was executed by hanging on 30 January 1946 in Minsk

Gustav-Adolf Riebel

Gustav-Adolf Riebel ( Burglehn-Muskau , 13 March 1896 – Morosov , 23 August 1942 ) was a German panzer division officer.

Young cavalry officer during the First World War, he became part of the new armored troops (panzertruppen)of the Wehrmacht, becoming the main officers under General Ewald von Kleist during the campaign of Poland and General Heinz Guderian during the French campaign.

Considered a war expert with armored vehicles and highly esteemed for his courage, impetus and energy, he took command in 1941 of the 11 Panzer-Division armored regiment that drove to Belgrade during the invasion of Yugoslavia and then led with great skill during the advance in the Ukrainian steppe during the Barbarossa operation . In 1942 , promoted to oberst , he assumed the command of the new Panzerregiment 24, assigned to the 24. Panzer-Division, leading him to a series of brilliant successes during the operation Blue. He was mortally wounded on August 23, 1942 during the march on Stalingrad, as he led from the front line the advance of his panzer approaching from the south to the city on the Volga . He was promoted posthumously to the rank of generalmajor.

Eberhard Rodt

Eberhard Rodt (4 December 1895 – 14 December 1979) was a German general during World War II who command several divisions. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves of Nazi Germany .

He joined the Bavarian 2. Ulanen-Regiment “König” in Ansbach as a war volunteer in 1914 and was commissioned the following year. He served in the Reichsheer and later commanded I.Abteilung / Kavallerie-Regiment 18 (1936-1939), Kavallerie-Regiment 7 (1939), Aufklärungs-Abteilung 25 (1939-1940), Schützen-Regiment 66 (1942), and 22. Panzer-Division (1942-1943). Sent to Italy to recuperate with the remnants of his staff, Rodt was promoted to Generalmajor on 1 March 1943. Despite the fact that he had basically failed as a panzer division commander in Russia, Rodt was charged with forming the 15. Panzergrenadier-Division in Sicily out of the survivors of the 15. Panzer-Division of the Afrikakorps plus assorted miscellaneous units. He was thus, in effect, given a second chance professionally! Rodt took full advantage of this opportunity by performing brilliantly as a divisional commander in Sicily, Italy, and on the Western Front, and fully justified the confidence of his superiors had in him (despite his previous failure in the East). He was promoted to Generalleutnant on 1 March 1944 and led the 15. Panzergrenadier-Division till the end of the war in 1945.

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