World War 2 Generals – V thru Von K / Weltkrieg 2 Generäle – V bis Von K

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Paul Völckers

Paul Gustav Völckers, 15 March 1891 – 25 January 1946, was a German General of the Infantry in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded the XXVII Army Corps. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross of Nazi Germany.

Völckers surrendered to the Red Army in the course of the Soviet 1944 Operation Bagration. He died in a POW camp in the Soviet Union in 1946.

Hans-Jürgen von Arnim

Hans-Jürgen Bernhard Theodor von Arnim, 4 April 1889 – 1 September 1962, was a German colonel-general (Generaloberst) who served during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross (Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Kurt von Briesen

Kurt von Briesen, born 3 May 1886, Anklam – † 20 November 1941, Isjum on the Donetz (Ukraine)) was a General of Infantry awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross by Hitler for gallantry in the Polish campaign.

Rudolf von Bünau

Rudolf von Bünau, 19 August 1890 – 14 January 1962, was a German general who commanded several Corps during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade, with Oak Leaves, were awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership). At the Enns River, in Austria, von Bünau surrendered to Major General Stanley Eric Reinhart’s 261st Infantry Regiment. He was released in April 1947.

His son, also named Rudolf von Bünau, was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross on 8 August 1943 as Hauptmann and commander of Panzer-Aufklärungs-Abteilung 9 (9th Panzer Reconnaissance Battalion). He was killed in action just one week later on 15 August 1943 south of Roslavl and posthumously promoted to Major. His other son, Oberleutnant Günther von Bünau, a recipient of the German Cross in Gold, was also killed in action in 1943.

Kurt von der Chevallerie

Kurt Wilhelm Gustav Erdmann von der Chevallerie, 23 December 1891 – missing as of 18 April 1945, was a highly decorated General der Infanterie in the Wehrmacht during the Second World War who commanded the German 1st Army. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, which, especially its higher grade Oak Leaves, was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Kurt von der Chevallerie was placed on the Führerreserve on 31 January 1945 and disappeared on 18 April 1945 near Kolberg.

On 18 December 1918, Chevallerie married Dorothea Zander (3 May 1895 – 14 October 1957) in Berlin. The couple had four children, one son, Hans-Rudolf (1919–1940), killed in action as a Lieutenant, and three daughters.

Friedrich von Cochenhausen

Friedrich von Cochenhausen, 14 July  1879 in Marburg – 20 July 1946 in Hochstadt am Main, was a German officer, last general of artillery in the Second World War and author of numerous books.

Moritz von Drebber

Moritz von Drebber, 12 February 1892 – 30 May 1968, was a general in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany during World War II who commanded the 297th Infantry Division. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

Drebber surrendered the division on 25 January 1943 during the Battle of Stalingrad. He then sent a letter to Friedrich Paulus stating “he and his soldiers were well received by the Red Army.” Drebber also asked Paulus to “give up the useless resistance and to surrender with the whole army.” He joined the National Committee for a Free Germany while in captivity. He was released in 1949.

Maximilian von Edelsheim

Konstanz Johann Georg Maximilian Reichsfreiherr von Edelsheim, 6 July 1897 – 26 April 1994, was a German general during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub und Schwertern). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Franz Ritter von Epp

Franz Xaver Ritter von Epp (16 October 1868 – 31 December 1946) was a regular officer in the Imperial German Army of the early part of the 20th century, who rose to the office of Reichsstatthalter of Bavaria, a position of dictatorial power, under the Nazis.

Gottfried von Erdmannsdorff

Gottfried von Erdmannsdorff (25 April 1893 – 30 January 1946) was a German general during World War II. He was convicted by a Soviet military tribunal for war crimes at the Minsk Trial and executed in 1946.

Nikolaus von Falkenhorst

Nikolaus von Falkenhorst (17 January 1885 – 18 June 1968) was a German general during World War II. He planned and commanded the German invasion of Denmark and Norway in 1940, and was commander of German troops during the occupation of Norway from 1940 to 1944.

After the war, Falkenhorst was tried by a joint British-Norwegian military tribunal for war crimes. He was convicted and sentenced to death in 1946. The sentence was later commuted to twenty years’ imprisonment. Falkenhorst was released in 1953 and died in 1968.

Werner von Fritsch

Werner, Freiherr von Fritsch (4 August 1880 – 22 September 1939) was the commander-in-chief of the German Army from 1933 to 1938. He served in the German High Command.

Hans Freiherr von Funck

General Hans Emil Richard Freiherr von Funck (23 December 1891 – 14 February 1979) was a highly decorated Panzer General in the German army during World War II.

Paul von Hase

Karl Paul Immanuel von Hase (24 July 1885 – 8 August 1944) was a German career soldier and figured among the members of the resistance against Adolf Hitler’s Nazi regime.

Hase was born in Hanover. He was the fifth child of Paul and Frieda von Hase. On 12 December 1921, Hase married Margarete, Baronesse von Funck in Neustreiltz. They had four children: Ina, Maria-Gisela, Alexander and Friedrich-Wilhelm.

He held the following posts in the Wehrmacht during the time of the Third Reich:
1933–1934 Battalion commander in Neuruppin;
1934–1935 Battalion commander in Landsberg an der Warthe;
1935–1938 Commander 50th Regiment;
1939–1940 Commander 46th Division;
1940 Commander 56th Division;
1940–1944 City commandant of Berlin.

From 1938, Brigadier-General von Hase was privy to the conspiracy plans plotted by such men as Wilhelm Canaris, Hans Oster, Generals Erwin von Witzleben, Franz Halder and Erich Hoepner. He was an uncle of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the famous Lutheran pastor who also took part in the conspiracy.

On 20 July 1944, after the failed assassination of Hitler at the Wolf’s Lair in East Prussia, Hase ordered Major Otto Ernst Remer of the Infantry Regiment Großdeutschland to seal off the government quarter in Berlin during the subsequent coup d’état attempt. Remer later removed the cordon and Hase was arrested by the Gestapo that evening whilst he was dining with Joseph Goebbels.

In the trial against him and a number of other members of the plot at the Volksgerichtshof on 8 August 1944, he was sentenced to death and hanged later the same day at Plötzensee Prison in Berlin.

Harald von Hirschfeld

Harald von Hirschfeld (10 July 1912 – 18 January 1945) was a German general who commanded the 78.Volksgrenadier-Division during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. In September 1943, as a Colonel in the 1st Mountain Division, he played a major role in the defeat and subsequent massacre of the Italian Acqui Division in Cephallonia.

Von Hirschfeld was married to Sylvinia von Dönhoff, who later married the former fighter pilot Adolf Galland. He was severely injured in an aerial attack in defense of the Dukla Pass and died on his way to the field hospital.

Alfred Ritter von Hubicki

Alfred Eduard Franz Ritter von Hubicki (5 February 1887 – 14 July 1971) in Friedrichsdorf (Hungarian Frigyesfalva, in Bereg County, Ungarn, today Ukraine, July 14, 1971 in Vienna was a Hungarian born Austro-Hungarian and Austrian army officer who was a Panzer General in the German army during World War II and a winner of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Johann von Kielmansegg*

Count Johann Adolf Graf von Kielmansegg, 30 December 1906 – 26 May 2006, was a German general staff officer during the Second World War and later general of the Bundeswehr.

Otto von Knobelsdorff

Heinrich Otto Ernst von Knobelsdorff, 31 March 1886 – 21 October 1966, was a German general who commanded armored Panzer units and served during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. During the war, he was defeated by American forces under General George S. Patton at the Battle of Metz.

Joachim von Kortzfleisch

Joachim Otto August Achatius Kortzfleisch, 3 January 1890 – 20 April 1945, was a German army general who was the commander of the defense group III (Berlin) and had a role in ensuring the failure of the attempted coup after the July 20 Plot attempt to assassinate Adolf Hitler.

Eberhard von Kurowski

Eberhard von Kurowski (10 September 1895 – 11 September 1957) was a German general (Generalleutnant) in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

Kurowski surrendered to the Red Army in the course of the Soviet 1944 Vitebsk–Orsha Offensive. Convicted as a war criminal in the Soviet Union, he was held until 1955.

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