World War 2 Heer Officers, NCO’s, Etc. – A thru F / 2. Weltkrieg Heer Offiziere, Unteroffiziere, Etc. – A durch F

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Wilhelm Adam

Wilhelm Adam, 28 March 1893 – 24 November 1978 in Dresden, was a German politician and officer of the Prussian army, the German army, the SA ( SA sergeant ), the Reichswehr, the Wehrmacht (last Colonel ), the Kasernierten People’s Police (KVP). and most recently Major General of the NVA at the NVA School Dresden. Following the German surrender after the Battle of Stalingrad, he became a member of the National Committee for a Free Germany. Adam later served in the National People’s Army of East Germany.

Wilhelm Bach

Wilhelm Bach, 5 November 1892 – 22 December 1942, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. His defense of Halfaya Pass gave rise to his nickname (alluding to his peacetime occupation as a Lutheran minister), ‘the Pastor of Hellfire Pass’. Wilhelm Bach was captured by British troops in Libya and was taken to South Africa and later Canada. He died after cancer surgery at Chorley Park military hospital in Toronto and was posthumously promoted to the rank of Oberstleutnant der Reserve.

Franz Bäke

Franz Bäke, 28 February 1898 – 12 December 1978, was a German officer and tank commander during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords of Nazi Germany. In the post-war popular culture, Bäke is one of the panzer aces, that is, a highly decorated German tank commanders popularised in the English-language translations of the German author Franz Kurowski’s Panzer Aces series.

Helmut Beck-Broichsitter

Helmut Beck-Broichsitter, 30 August 1914 – 25 September 2000, was a German military police officer during World War II. Following the war, Beck-Broichsitter was involved in several neo-Nazi movements.

Beck-Broichsitter became a member of the Nazi Party in 1931, of the Sturmabteilung in 1932, and of the police in 1939. In the years till 1944, he served in Feldgendarmerie units that took part in rear-security operations (Bandenbekämpfung) in the occupied Soviet Union.

He received Ritterkreuz in 4 September 1940 as Oberleutnant and Chef 14.(Panzerjäger)Kompanie / IV.(Schützen-)Bataillon / Infanterie-Regiment “Großdeutschland”.

After the war Beck-Broichsitter founded the “Bruderschaft” (Fraternity) in 1949 of former officers of the Wehrmacht and his emphasis was on opposing Bolshevism. Accused of spying for the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, he resigned from the leadership. He later joined the openly Nazi-orientated Socialist Reich Party.

Major Winrich Behr

Winrich Behr, 22 January 1918 – 25 April 2011, was a Panzer Captain and recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross who was on the intelligence staff of the Sixth Army during the Stalingrad encirclement. Behr had served Friedrich Paulus, Erwin Rommel, Gunther von Kluge, Walter Model. He was the witness of Model’s last hours in Ruhr Pocket.

In January 1943 he was sent by Paulus to try to convince Hitler of the hopelessness of winning the war on the Eastern Front; this mission did not succeed.

After the war, Behr began studying at the University of Bonn. He served as the assistant general secretary of the Europäische Wirtschaftsgemeinschaft(EWG, or European Economic Union) Commission in Brussels.

A Decade after the war, Winrich Behr sought out the burial site of the Field Marshal Walter Model in the isolated woods south of Duisburg, together with Hansgeorg Model, the field marshal’s son.

Herbert Berger

Herbert Berger, 24 November 1912 – 16 December 2000, was a highly decorated Leutnant der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Alfred Ingemar Berndt

Alfred Ingemar Berndt, 22 April 1905 in Bromberg – 28 March 1945 at Veszprém, was a German journalist and writer and close collaborator of Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. He is regarded as the propagandistic creator of the “Desert Fox” myth to the German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel.

Hans-Günther Bethke

Hans-Günther Bethke, 20 May 1913 – 14 September 1942, was a highly decorated Captain in the Wehrmacht during World War II. Bethke was a recipient of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded the title of Bravery or Successful Military Leadership. Hans-Günther Bethke was killed on 14 September 1942 near Leningrad.

Günter Billing

Günter Joachim Billing, 9 April 1923 in Naumburg (Saale) – 23 December 1944 in Belgium, was a German lieutenant who was captured in the course of the Operation Griffin during the Battle of the Bulge by American soldiers and then shot.

Heinrich Boigk

Heinrich Boigk, 30 October 1912 – 28 March 2003, was a Leutnant der Reserves in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Georg Bonk

Georg Bonk, 12 March 1917 – 10 October 1982, was a highly decorated Oberfeldwebel der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Otto Brakat

Otto Brakat, 15 January 1916 – 31 January 1978, was a highly decorated Oberfeldwebel in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Georg Briel

Georg Briel, 21 August 1907 – 16 May 1980, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Georg Briel was captured by Allied troops in May 1945 and was released by June 1945.

Wilhelm Brückner

Wilhelm Brückner, 11 December 1884 in Baden-Baden – 18 August 1954 in Herbsdorf, Upper Bavaria, was until 1940 Adolf Hitler’s chief adjutant.

Albert Brux

Albert Georg Brux, 11 November 1907 – 16 December 2001, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Albert Brux was captured by Soviet forces in January 1945, he was held until 1956.

Wolfgang von Bullion

Wolfgang Gottfried Julius Count von Bullion, 9 April 1918 in Stuttgart – 4 February 1943 on the Eastern Front at Skubry, was a German officer of the Wehrmacht, Hauptmann (Captain) der Gebirgsjäger and owner of the German Cross in Gold. Whether he is related to General-Engineer of the Luftwaffe Dipl.-Ing. Konrad Graf von Bullion,1893-1976, from Würzburg could not be determined correctly, but it can be assumed.

Friedrich Carl

Friedrich Eduard Matthias Carl, 24 September 1916 – 5 December 2013, was a Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Carl later served in the Bundeswehr of the Federal Republic of Germany.

Otto Carius

Otto Carius, 27 May 1922 – 24 January 2015, was a German tank ace within the German Army who fought during World War II and was credited with destroying more than 150 tanks. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes mit Eichenlaub). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves were awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Carius had been drafted twice before, but sent home as “Not fit for service at present underweight!”. In May 1940, however, Carius was drafted into the 104th Infantry Replacement Battalion. Following training, he volunteered for the Panzer Corps. Carius learned the fundamentals of tank warfare at Putlos in Holstein as a member of the 7th Panzer Replacement Battalion. His unit was integrated into the newly formed 21st Panzer Regiment and in June 1941 was sent to East Prussia. He experienced his first battle as a loader in a Panzer 38(t) during Operation Barbarossa in late June 1941. It was during this operation that Carius suffered wounds from a round that struck his tank.

In 1943, Carius transferred to the schwere Panzer-Abteilung 502 (502 heavy tank battalion). This unit fought at the Leningrad front and then in the area of Narva, Estonia (Battle of Narva), and was subordinated to Strachwitz Battle Group, under the command of Hyacinth Graf Strachwitz von Groß-Zauche und Camminetz. Carius was severely wounded on 24 July 1944 while reconnoitering a village on a motorcycle ahead of his tanks. Until that day, he was unofficially running the 2nd company of 502nd. He officially became the commander of the 2nd company; on the same day, he was shot through the leg and arm, received four bullets in the back and one through the neck. He subsequently became the commander of a Jagdtiger company of the 512th Heavy Antitank Battalion (schwere Panzerjägerabteilung) in the West at the beginning of 1945. On 8 March 1945, without finishing its training, the 2nd company was directed to the front line near Siegburg. It then took part in the defense of the River Rhine and eventually surrendered to the United States Army on 15 April 1945.

Hans Christern*

Hans Christern, 24 January 1900 – 17 June 1966, was a highly decorated Oberst in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross of the Third Reich. Christern took over command of the 7th Panzer Division in March 1945 which he surrendered to British troops in May 1945 northwest of Berlin.

Following the war, he worked as a farmer. He was involved in the CDU, and ran for office in the West German federal election of 1949, but failed to win his seat.

Joachim Domaschk

Joachim Domaschk, 20 May 1914 – 21 June 1986, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

His last service position was in the Generalstab of the Oberkommando des Heeres in the Heerespersonalamt (HPA — Army Personnel Office).

Wilhelm Drewes

Wilhelm Drewes, 26 May 1907 – 14 July 1982, was a highly decorated Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Walter Elflein

Walter Elflein, 10 December 1914 – 30 December 2000, was a highly decorated Major der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

 Karl Ens

Karl Ens, 21 March 1896 at Schön-Münzach, Germany- 15 April 1945 missing near Görlitz/Saxony, Germany, was a highly decorated Oberst in the Wehrmacht during World War II. During the First World War, Ens was Leutnant in the Baden Grenadier Regiment. During this war, he received both Iron Crosses, the Knight Cross with Swords to the House Order of Hohenzollern, the Knight Cross of the Baden Karl Friedrich Verdienst Order, the Knight Cross 2nd class with Swords of the Baden Zähringen Lion, and the Verwundeten Abzeichen in Silver.

Karl Ens finally reached the rank of Oberst during the Second World War. He was missing in action on 15th April 1945 and was formally declared dead by the AG Baiersbronn on 11th December 1957.

Heinz-Otto Fabian

Heinz-Otto Fabian, 1 March 1918 – 16 September 1990, was a highly decorated Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II and later a Brigadegeneral of the Bundeswehr. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Fritz Fechner

Fritz Fechner, 16 December 1913 – 6 April 1990, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II and an Oberst in the Bundeswehr. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Walther-Peer Fellgiebel

Walther-Peer Fellgiebel, 7 May 1918 – 14 October 2001, was a German officer in the Wehrmacht, serving during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. His father was the General der Nachrichtentruppe Erich Fellgiebel, who as a conspirator of the 20 July plot was sentenced to death and executed on 4 September 1944.

He joined the Association of Knight’s Cross Recipients (AKCR) in 1954 and as of 1961 served on the board of directors. He became head of the order commission of the AKCR in 1970, a position he held until 1985. From this work evolved the book Die Träger des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes, 1939–1945: Die Inhaber der höchsten Auszeichnung des Zweiten Weltkrieges aller Wehrmachtteile — The bearers of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross 1939–1945: The owners of the highest award of the Second World War of all Branches of the Armed Forces. For many years this book was considered a reference work on this topic. Fellgiebel himself indicated that the book is not official. The deteriorating situation of the Third Reich during the final days of World War II left a number of nominations incomplete and pending in various stages of the approval process, loss of evidence of the presentation was also an issue in the verification process. In some of these instances, the AKCR later accepted and listed holders of the Knight’s Cross with questionable evidence. Author Veit Scherzer analyzed the German National Archives and found discrepancies in 193 instances of the original 7,322 listings by Fellgiebel (false acceptance rate of 2.6%).

For 13 years he worked as a manager at the Deutsche Zündwaren-Monopol-Gesellschaft.

Peter Frantz

Peter Ulrich Frantz, 24 July 1917 – 11 March 2001, was a highly decorated Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Rudolf Flinzer

Dr.-Ing. Rudolf Flinzer, 9 November 1889 – 17 June 1976, was a highly decorated Oberst der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

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