World War 2 Heer Officers, NCO’s, Etc. – G thru K / Heer-Offiziere des 2. Weltkrieges, Unteroffiziere, Etc. – G durch K

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Johannes Grimminger

Johannes Grimminger, 6 June 1914 – 16 April 1945, was a highly decorated Major der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. Johannes Grimminger was killed in der Lausitz near Döbern as Major der Reserve and Kommandeur/Führer Panzergrenadier-Regiment 192 on April 16th, 1945.

Günter Halm

Günter Halm, born 27 August 1922, was a German infanteer and the youngest member of the Afrika Korps to be awarded the Knight’s Cross for his bravery in action.

Josef Heindl

Josef Heindl, 10 March 1904 – 10 September 1943, was a German officer who served in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a posthumous recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. He was also posthumously promoted to Oberstleutnant of the Reserves.

Matthäus Hetzenauer

Matthäus Hetzenauer, 23 December 1924 in Tyrol, Austria – 3 October 2004, was an Austrian sniper in the 3rd Mountain Division on the Eastern Front of World War II, who was credited with 345 kills. His longest confirmed kill was reported at 1100 meters. Hetzenauer was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes). The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Friedrich-Wilhelm “Fritz” Holzhäuer

Friedrich-Wilhelm “Fritz” Holzhäuer, 8 July 1902 – 14 December 1982, was a highly decorated Generalmajor in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Friedrich-Wilhelm Holzhäuer was captured by British forces in May 1945 and was held until 1947.

Helmut Hudel

Helmut Hudel, Born in Raunheim, 4 July 1915 – Frankfurt am Main, 11 March 1985,  was a German officer, commander of armored units and highly decorated Wehrmacht Major, distinguished himself on the Russian front, in Tunisia, Italy, and finally on the western front, until the end of the Second World War.  Helmut Hudel was captured by American troops on April 1945 in the Ruhr Pocket .

Konrad Hupfer

Konrad Hupfer, 21 October 1911 – 10 April 1944, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Willy Jähde

Willy Jähde, 18 January 1908 – 25 April 2002, was a highly decorated Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II and a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Willy Jähde was captured by American troops in May 1945. He was later transferred to Soviet custody but escaped.

Georg Jura

Georg Jura, born 25 July 1912 in Gliwice – died January 27, 1995, was a German sergeant and Knight Cross of the Second World War .

Siegfried Knappe

Siegfried Knappe, 15 JanuaWar.17 – 1 December 2008, was an officer in the German Army (Heer) during World War II. Towards the end of the war, Knappe was stationed in Berlin, where he gave daily briefings at the Führerbunker.

As a young artillery lieutenant (Leutnant der Artillerie) in Panzer Group Kleist, Siegfried Knappe participated in the Invasion of France. Knappe was decorated for actions that took place on the night of 14 June 1940. The actions took place in the Paris area, south of Tremblay-en-France, at the Ourcq canal. A group of French sailors had apparently not been informed of the decision to declare Paris an open city. As a result, they were defending a bridge with machine guns from a house across the canal. After German infantry failed to clear the area with mortar fire, artillery support was requested. Though Knappe was the Battalion Adjutant and it was not his duty to man the gun, he moved up to the front with the infantry. Because the area was wooded, the 105 mm gun had to be brought up and fired almost at point-blank range directly into the house. The German infantry was hidden behind a building by the bridge, where the gun was maneuvered, but in order to fire all seven crew members would be exposed to machine gun fire. On the mark, the gun was moved, aimed, and fired. Three of the seven crew members were wounded but the machine gun nest was destroyed. This action opened the road for the infantry.

Knappe was wounded by a bullet entering the back of his hand and exiting through his wrist. On 19 June 1940, he was evacuated. For his bravery, Knappe received the Iron Cross 2nd Class. He also received the Black Wound Badge for his wounds.

Knappe went on to fight on the Eastern Front and the Italian Campaign. While participating in the invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, he received the Iron Cross 1st class for his bravery, in particular for leading artillery attacks from forward positions. Knappe was also wounded an additional three times in the course of his career. After attending General Staff College, he rose to the rank of Major. Knappe ended the war fighting in Berlin while a member of General Helmuth Weidling’s staff.

After five years of captivity in the Soviet Union, Knappe was released to West Germany in 1949. Knappe emigrated to the United States with his family and settled in Ohio. There he wrote his memoirs: Soldat: Reflections of a German Soldier, 1936-1949

The Oscar-nominated film Downfall (2004), about German dictator Adolf Hitler’s last days, was based in part on Knappe’s memoirs.

Wilhelm Knauth

Dr. Wilhelm Knauth, 29 January 1916 – 25 April 1945, was a highly decorated Hauptmann der Reserve in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Kurt Knispel

Kurt Knispel, 20 September 1921 – 28 April 1945, was a Sudeten German Heer panzer loader, gunner and later commander, and was the highest scoring tank ace of World War II with a total of 168 confirmed tank kills; the actual number, although unconfirmed, may be as high as 195. He is counted with Johannes Bölter, Ernst Barkmann, Otto Carius, and Michael Wittmann as being one of the, if not the, greatest tank ace of all time.

Heinz-Michael Koller-Kraus

Heinz-Michael Koller-Kraus, 27 May 1909 – 22 April 1993, was a German officer of the Reichswehr and the Wehrmacht, last Colonel in the General Staff and winner of the German Cross in Gold and General of the Bundeswehr.

Alfons König

Alfons König, 29 December 1898 – 8 July 1944, was a German officer in the infantry, serving during World War II and a recipient of the coveted Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

He was killed in action on 8 July 1944 while defending Bobruisk.

Ernst Kruse

Ernst Kruse, 1 October 1915 – 15 October 1944, was a highly decorated Oberfähnrich in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Ernst Kruse was killed on 15 October 1944 near Serock, Poland.

Johannes Kümmel

Johannes Kümmel, 21 July 1909 – 26 February 1944, was a highly decorated Oberst in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Johannes Kümmel was killed in an automobile accident on 26 February 1944 in Cisterna, Italy. He was later posthumously promoted to Oberst.

Ekkehard Kylling Schmidt

Ekkehard Kylling Schmidt, 21 June 1918-28 August 2000, was a highly decorated captain in the Heer during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves what awarded to extreme battlefield bravery or to recognize successful military leadership.

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