World War 2 Heer Officers, NCO’s, Etc. – S thru Z / Weltkrieg 2 Heer Offiziere, Unteroffiziere, Etc. – S durch Z

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Joachim Sadrozinski

Joachim Sadrozinski, 9 September 1907 – 29 September 1944, was a German officer who took part in the 20 July plot.

Sadrozinski was born in Tilsit, East Prussia (today Sovetsk, Kaliningrad, Russia), and joined the Weimar German Reichswehr as an officer cadet in April 1926. He passed the Prussian Military Academy in Berlin in April 1939 and later fought in the Second World War. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel, joined the general staff, and in June 1944 was wounded. He became a group leader on the staff of General Friedrich Fromm, Commander in Chief of the Replacement Army (Ersatzheer), and served as deputy to Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg. On 20 July 1944 Sadrozinski was responsible for the duplication and transmission of the “Valkyrie” orders in the Bendlerblock in Berlin. He was arrested by the Gestapo immediately after the attack on Hitler on 20 July 1944 and on 21 August 1944 was sentenced to death by the Volksgerichtshof. On 29 September 1944 Sadrozinski was hanged at Plötzensee prison, with Joachim Meichssner, Fritz von der Lancken, Wilhelm-Friedrich zu Lynar, and Otto Herfurth.

Sadrozinski was married to Elfriede Hempel, and they had one daughter and four sons.

Peter Sauerbruch

Peter Sauerbruch, 5 June 1913 – 29 September 2010, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant i.G. in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Kurt Schäfer

Kurt Schäfer, 19 August 1913 – 15 May 1992, was a German officer in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was a recipient of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and what awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. He was also awarded the very rare Close Combat Clasp in Gold which was of only 631 awards.

Walter Scherf

Walter Scherf, 21 February 1917 – 7 April 2003, was a highly decorated Hauptmann of the Reserves in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

He received the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes on 23 February 1944 as Oberleutnant der Reserve. From the Panzer I to the Panzer VI, Walter Scherf was able to marry these battle talents to a capacity for the larger strategic factors involved in command of the Panzertruppe’s armored fighting force.

Few men in the history of the Panzertruppe have been able to make the transition from the Panzer I, Panzer II, Panzer III, Panzer IV, Panzer V, Panzer VI, in each of one of these tanks, to successful high command in a capacity to probe deeper and see further than his contemporaries and ability to give effect to this insight in a practical way. His experience in armored combat was probably longer and more diverse than any other. From 1939-1945, he met and battled practically every type of allied armor. Walter Scherf emerged as a truly outstanding individual, where his skill, initiative, and flexibility were paramount. He took his responsibilities right to the heart into the very vortex of armored combat and sustained his seriously energetic approach to every situation.

Hauptmann Walter Scherf later in the war became the Commanding officer of the newly created Schwere Panzerjager Abteilung 512, equipped with the Jagdtiger heavy tank destroyer, which this unit included top quality personnel and stellar individuals such as Hauptmann Albert Ernst, an experienced Panzerjager, who was nicknamed The Tiger of Vitebsk for destroying 54 T-34’s with his Nashorn tank destroyer in Russia. And Oberleutnant Otto Carius, who had been already decorated with the Oak leaves while with 2./Schwere Panzer Abteilung 502.

Wilhelm Schmidt

Wilhelm Schmidt, 21 April 1920 in Dotzheim – 23 December 1944 in Belgium, was a German corporal, who was sentenced to death during Operation Griffin during the Battle of the Bulge by an American tribunal and shot dead.

Wilhelm Schöning

Wilhelm Schöning, June 8, 1908 – November 2, 1987, served as commander of the 66th Panzergrenadier Regiment of the 13th Panzer Division during the Siege of Budapest.

Alfred Schreiber

Oberleutnant der Reserve Alfred Schreiber, 3 March 1914 in Praterschütz, Meißen, Sachsen – 24 September 1991 in Meerbusch-Strümp, Westfalen, received the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross) in 20 April 1943 as a Oberfeldwebel and Zugführer (Platoon Leader) in 6.Kompanie / II.Bataillon / Grenadier-Regiment 365 / 211.Infanterie-Division / LIII.Armeekorps / 2.Panzerarmee / Heeresgruppe Mitte. He also receives Eisernes Kreuzes II.Klasse und I.Klasse (Iron Cross 2nd Class and 1st Class), Infanterie-Sturmabzeichen (Infantry Assault Badge), and Medaille “Winterschlacht im Osten 1941/42” (Ostmedaille).

Fritz-Rudolf Schultz

Fritz-Rudolf Schultz, 19 February 1917 – 2 March 2002, was a German politician and member of the FDP. During World War II, Schultz served in the Wehrmacht as an officer and regimental commander. He was awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves.

After the war, Schultz initially worked on his parent’s vineyard in Gau-Bischofsheim. He became a member of the German Bundestag and was elected Ombudsman for the Military (Wehrbeauftragter [de]) on 11 March 1970. He held this office until 19 March 1975.

Johann Schwerdfeger

Johann Schwerdfeger24 November 1914 – 29 December 2015, was a non-commissioned officer who served in the German Army during World War II. He was a recipient of the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The movie Cross of Iron is based upon the novel The Willing Flesh, by Willi Heinrich, published in 1956; it may be loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s story. He turned 100 in November 2014.

History

Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infantry Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the Third Company of Infantry Regiment 186 of the 73rd Infantry Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger Regiment 228 of the 101st Jäger Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maykop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula , the setting of the novel The Patient Flesh (The Willing Flesh). On 17 May 1943, Schwerdfeger what Awarded the Knight’s Cross as a platoon leader in the First Company. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, what a severely wounded, and what awarded Oak Leaves for his Knight’s Cross on 14 May 1944; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger so earned two tank destruction badges. He was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war.

Bodo Spranz

Prof. em. Dr. Bodo Heinrich Ferdinand Otto Spranz, 1 January 1920 – 1 September 2007, was a highly decorated Hauptmann in the Wehrmacht during World War II and one of the leading researchers of preclassic Meso-American history. He was a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Ludwig Stautner

Ludwig Stautner, 4 May 1895 – 5 January 1983, was a highly decorated Oberst in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded several divisions. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.

He received the Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes on 20 June 1940 as a Major in the 3.Gebirgs-Division. Stautner participated in the following battles and operations: Invasion of Poland, Norwegian Campaign, Battles of Narvik, Operation Barbarossa, Operation Silberfuchs, Operation Renntier, Operation Platinfuchs, and the Siege of Leningrad.

Karl Torley

Karl Torley, 16 October 1913 – 19 July 1943, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. Karl Torley was killed on 19 July 1943 in Kalynivka, Ukraine. He was posthumously promoted to Oberstleutnant.

Hans-Günther van Hooven

Hans-Günther van Hooven, 27 October 1896 in Berlin † 27 September 1964, was a German officer.

Life

The son of Prussian civil servants and officers and was at the beginning of World War I a war volunteer who took the rank of lieutenant at the end of the war. Subsequently, he was a senior employee in a Königsberger forwarding company and studied economics. In 1935, he was reactivated as a captain in the Wehrmacht. As a colonel and commander of a news department, on December 28, 1942, he was flown to the Cauldron of Stalingrad as the newly-appointed news chief of the 6th Army, where he witnessed the end of the 6th Army. As a Soviet prisoner of war in September 1943, he was one of the founding members of the Federal German Officers (BDO) and was Vice President. He was co-signatory of the founding documents of the BDO  “Appeal to the German Generals and Officers! To the people and Wehrmacht!” In a by-election, he was elected a member of the NKFD. He was a member of the executive committee and worked in the winter of 1944/45 as a front representative on the Baltic front for the rescue of German soldiers from the Kurland Pocket.

After the dissolution of the NKFD in November 1945, he remained for four years in the USSR, before he returned to Germany in April 1950. From 1 December 1950 until retirement, he worked for the travel agency of the GDR and was responsible there for the development of travel and tourism of the GDR with foreign countries.

*Note on the Alphabetical Order of the Page – the title of ‘von’ or ‘zu’ are always in front of the last name for German names such as von Richter. In American English, the name of the person is placed in alphabetical order based on the title. In German, you would just find the name von Richter under R. For purposes of this website, you will look up the person under V for von Richter. 

Georg von Boeselager

Georg von Boeselager, 25 August 1915 – 27 August 1944, was a German nobleman and an officer in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany, who led rear security operations in the Army Group Centre Rear Area on the Eastern Front, calling for harsh measures, including the shooting of all males in gang-infested areas.

Along with his younger brother Philipp von Boeselager, he participated in the 1944 20 July Plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler. Soon after the plot failed, Boeselager was killed in action and was posthumously awarded the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Gerlach von Gaudecker-Zuch

Gerlach von Gaudecker-Zuch, 24 March 1909 – 11 March 1970, was a highly decorated Oberst in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Waldemar von Gazen

Waldemar von Gazen called Waldemar von Gaza, 6 December 1917 – 13 January 2014, was an officer in the German Wehrmacht and recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords during World War II. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves and Swords was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Albert Graf von der Goltz

Albert Emil Johannes Hermann Graf von der Goltz, 24 June 1893 – 16 March 1944, was a German Oberst der Reserve (Colonel of the Reserves) during World War II and recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Werner Karl von Haeften

Werner Karl von Haeften, 9 October 1908 – 21 July 1944, was an Oberleutnant in the Wehrmacht, who took part in the military-based conspiracy against Adolf Hitler known as the 20 July plot. He is considered a hero of the German anti-Nazi resistance.

Clemens-Heinrich Graf von Kageneck

Clemens-Heinrich Graf von Kageneck, 17 October 1913 – 18 March 2005, was a highly decorated Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II who commanded Panzer-Abteilung 503. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Wilhelm von Malachowski

Wilhelm von Malachowski, 6 June 1914 – 28 October 1980, was a highly decorated Major in the Wehrmacht during World War II, and one of only 882 recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross and its higher grade Oak Leaves was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Albrecht Mertz von Quirnheim

Albrecht Mertz von Quirnheim, 25 March 1905 – 21 July 1944, was a German Army colonel and a resistance fighter in Nazi Germany involved in the 20 July plot against Adolf Hitler.

Irnfried Freiherr von Wechmar

Irnfried Freiherr von Wechmar, 12 February 1899 – 27 November 1959, was a highly decorated Oberst in the Wehrmacht during World War II and an Oberst der Reserve in the Bundeswehr. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

Karl Prinz zu Salm-Horstmar

Karl Walrad Emich Hermann Bolko Friedrich von Salm-Horstmar, 8 January 1911 – 2 August 1991,  was a German Colonel in Heer. He received Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes in 19 February 1942 as Rittmeister and Kommandeur Aufklärungs-Abteilung 123 / 123.Infanterie-Division.

Wilhelm Walther

Wilhelm Walther, 27 January 1910 – 25 November 2010, was a highly decorated Oberstleutnant in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross, the first of the Brandenburgers to receive one. The Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

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